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Writing a bridge part...

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Hategear, Dec 30, 2001.


  1. Hategear

    Hategear Workin' hard at hardly workin'.

    Apr 6, 2001
    Appleton, Swissconsin
    If this is not in the right place, please move it.

    I was thinking about bridges in songs the other day and I wondered, what is a bridge based on? I mean, how does one come up with a bridge part? I don't have much knowledge of theory, so it may be hard for me to even understand any answers to this question. The songs I have been writing don't have a bridge part. They generally follow the following pattern: verse variation as an intro > verse > chorus > verse > double chorus > verse variation as an outro.

    I know there are no rules to writing your own music and there are a lot of songs that don't have a bridge, but if I wanted to throw one into one of my songs, is there a "formula" for doing it?
     
  2. yawnsie

    yawnsie

    Apr 11, 2000
    London
    Like you say, there are no hard and fast rules for writing a bridge - usually, it's there (as the name suggests) to bridge the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, or any other gap between the verse and the chorus. Starting the bridge with the relative minor of the verse can be quite effective - for example, if the song is in A major, you'd start the bridge in F# minor.

    And if any of that makes the slightest bit of sense, I'll eat my hat! :p
     
  3. ldiezman

    ldiezman

    Jul 11, 2001
    Nashville
    yawnsie i understand you :). yeah man. a bridge is basically what it says.. it also keeps a song from become redundant.. Not all songs have them.. but
     
  4. Hategear

    Hategear Workin' hard at hardly workin'.

    Apr 6, 2001
    Appleton, Swissconsin
    Being redundant can be cool though.

    Being redundant can be cool though.

    Being redundant can be cool though.

    :D

    Seriously though, are there certain types of music that are more susceptible to bridges, maybe even necessary? I hear them in a lot of the bubblegum sh*t I hear on the radio, but there are other types of music that I listen to where there aren't any -- ever.
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    In Jazz theory, there are some rules for writing a bridge - although of course you don't have to follow them. So the idea is to use the "Cycle of fifths" and work your way back to the key or chord that is in the main part of the song, by picking chords that follow the cycle - this means you get a strong sense of resolution when you come back. It's really only one idea though.....
     
  6. um, here's just my thoughts.
    Is it feasible to put a guitar/bass/keys/whatever solo in place of a bridge? It can be an idea to keep in mind, if you can get it to work.