Yep..The bridge broke off...

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by skaboy, Apr 23, 2003.

  1. skaboy


    Oct 16, 2001
    Yep my bridge just broke off. A family handled the bass wrong way and the bridge just popped off.
    It came off clean so nothing was damaged and the bridge is still in one piece.Any ideas on how to get it back on?

    There's aways the repair shop and I've been getting in touch with my teacher..
  2. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    It's likely that the soundpost [in the bass]would have fallen down in this scenario. This is unfortunately something that would really necessitate a trip to a luthier to correct.

    BTW, all the cats I know would claw the #@$% out of you if you tried to strap toast to their back.
  3. nicklloyd

    nicklloyd Supporting Member/Luthier

    Jan 27, 2002
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I like a good piece of toast. Not too much butter, either. Sometimes toast is good with Nutella, but rye bread doesn't taste good with Nutella. Rye bread tastes really good with mustard, but who has mustard for breakfast?

    If yer soundpost hasn't fallen, and it isn't sitting skatty-wampus 'tween the top and the back, lay the bass down on your bed/futon/sofa. Tune the strings down three or four full turns. Place the bridge on the belly, making sure it is facing the right way. Put the A and D strings on first, centering the feet of the bridge with the imaginary (la, la, la) line that connects the ff hole notches. The A and D strings should also "sit" centered on the fingerboard.
    If this all is still making sense, pull the E and G strings onto the bridge, and tune the bass up. Tune each string a little at a time, and keep an eye that no gaps appear 'tween the feet and the belly of the bass.

    Or, find your car keys, load the bass into the car, start the engine, put the car in drive or first, and head over to the bass shop. Depending on how you live, you might need to raise the garage door before starting the engine and exiting the garage. Trust me...
  4. erik II

    erik II

    Jul 11, 2000
    Oslo, Norway
    isn't sitting... WHAT?? :eek:
  5. skaboy


    Oct 16, 2001
    Hmmm? I thought you actually glue the bridge in place.. maybe I think too much..
    Cheda Bro for your delightfully insightful idea.
  6. mflaherty

    mflaherty Supporting Member

    Oct 9, 2001

    Nickel alloy,

    Thanks for reminding me of one of my mom's favorite words. Her mother grew up a few farms down from the James brothers, and you know how many of them border ruffians had roots in Ole Kentuk.
  7. nicklloyd

    nicklloyd Supporting Member/Luthier

    Jan 27, 2002
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    skatty-wampus is just another name for cock-eyed

    Bridges aren't glued in place on upright basses. At least, they shouldn't be...
  8. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    What're yoo tryin' tuh say, BOAH? We's just as sivillized 's yoo cud evr wunt.
  9. John Sprague

    John Sprague Sam Shen's US Distributor

    Mar 10, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Sales Manager, CSC Products Inc.
    Q: You know why they built the Ohio River Bridge?
    A: So the Kentuck's could swim in the shade.

    Sure, skatty-wampus, it's an industry term. Like saying your properly set plane blade is "balls-on".
    Sorry, Nick brings out the worst in me.
  10. nicklloyd

    nicklloyd Supporting Member/Luthier

    Jan 27, 2002
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    When a plane blade is real f*ckin' sharp, its "finer than an RCH"

    pm me for the translation...
  11. mje


    Aug 1, 2002
    Southeast Michigan
    No- RCH is a subdivision of CH, which is an engineering term. Like, "slide that puppy over just a CH..." or "I think you wanna mill that down just a CH...."
  12. nicklloyd

    nicklloyd Supporting Member/Luthier

    Jan 27, 2002
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Well, in my vast experience with the CH measurements, the RCH is the finest, hands down.

    I've heard of a finish carpenter that carried around an RCH in a little clear tube. Just in case...