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Jazz/ Music Man or Music Man/ Jazz?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Blackbird, Jun 14, 2002.


  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    I found an early MIJ Squier Jazz souped up with Bart J's and a Badass II bridge and am considering getting it for the parts to make these two hybrid J+MM basses (I have the MMs from another Warmoth bass I found).

    Would one setup be better than the other? I had a crazy idea to get two identical basses, one with a MM/J and the other one with a J/MM configuration. Would one be better for a fretless than the other?

    Please feel free to ask for clarifications. Even I am not entirely sure where I'm going with this...

    Thanks for any input.
     
  2. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Id rather have the humbucker by the neck or middle position and the J at the bridge.

    I think that the humbucker by the bridge mught be better for fretless however.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    That's interesting, because that's the opposite of the standard Lakland layout. Sorta makes you wonder why the opposite setup is more common.

    Any other thoughts?
     
  4. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Are you more of a P guy or a Jazz guy?

    I think for rock the P tone is better, and the higher output comming from the humbucker at the P position does a good job of filling in that space.
    You deffinetly get more fundamental this way.

    If you like jazz basses, or Stingrays, then the humbucker at the bridge is better because it gives more definition much like a Jazz bass. On the downside (or upside depending on what you like)you lose the fundamental.

    It really depends on which position you want to emphasize. I almost always use the neck position PU in my G&L L-2500; sometimes with the bridge PU sometimes without. I rarely use only the bridge PU, and when I do its only for messing around with new tones.

    It really depends on what you like.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  5. notduane

    notduane

    Nov 24, 2000
    Location
    I think it's got a lot to do with aperture. Like's been said, an MM
    at the neck will get a bunch more fundamental vs. a J there.

    Check this out. It's fun :) ==> http://www.till.com/articles/PickupResponseDemo/
    You can plug in different "widths" (apertures) for the pups, as
    well as a buncha' other variables too...scale length, open string
    frequency, etc.
     
  6. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    I totally agree.

    Besides coil configurations, that is the other main factor in what makes a pickup sound like it does.

    Thats why I think a MM PU sounds so different than any other humbucker. Its mainly the way the huge polepieces sense a larger portuioin of the string.

    What was the question?

    Peace
    Nick
     
  7. I would just put the MM pup in the standard MM position. You know me, I happen to prefer basses with just one pickup. Simplicity.

    If you want to know what I'd do second, Jazz towards the neck, MM towards the bridge. (but not too close)

    I think the MM pup on MM basses is in the perfect spot.

    Mike J.
     
  8. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    I like the Sterling tons more than the Stingray.

    Which MM are you talking about?

    The Sterling has it slightly closer to the neck, and it makes all the difference.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  9. I'm talking about the Stingray. I always loved the way they sounded, and finally bought one about 6 months ago. The Sterlings are nice too; you can get an "almost" P-bass sound with the 3 way switch pointing towards the neck. I just like the chunkier sound of the 'Ray better. They're both great basses. I have nothing against basses with more than one pickup, I just like the fact that a P-bass sounds like a P-bass, a Stingray like a Stingray, etc. Again, I like to keep it simple.

    Later.
    Mike J.
     
  10. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    I think this demo has some bugs. Note, for instance, that the resulting curve is *very* different if the pickup is 5" from the nut vs. 5" from the bridge (with an open string the two are identical).
     
  11. DanGouge

    DanGouge

    May 25, 2000
    Canada!
    The Warwick Jazzman basses and few other also use that Lakland-style layout (J-neck, MM-bridge). It seems that that's the way most people want to do it, fretless or fretted.
     
  12. notduane

    notduane

    Nov 24, 2000
    Location
    Okie dokie. Here's the source code - http://www.till.com/articles/PickupResponseDemo/PickupPlot.java

    Sorry :(. I dunno beans about Java :rolleyes:.
     
  13. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Thans notduane. Looks to me like the main issue is that he's plotting the output at frequencies that don't exist - it's only a valid formula for harmonics. So i suspect that the thing with the pickup at one end or the other, if you only looked at the harmonics, would be the same actually.

    I'd like to modify it to do this, but I don't know the easiest way to compile the Java (modifying it is easy since it's so close to C++).

    Meanwhile, it's neat to put the J-bass numbers in there and see the suckout around the 400Hz-1kHz region (9th harmonic of open string). 9th harmonic on my bass disappears when both pickups are on. :)
     
  14. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Ive heard things about Ric basses and a loss of the 5th harmonic with only the neck PU on.

    My guess is that the PU is at a node in the strings wave