1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Newbie fingering question

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by tinyd, Apr 3, 2009.


  1. tinyd

    tinyd

    Mar 11, 2003
    Ireland
    Hi all
    I've been playing DB for a few weeks now, and I'm waiting for my first lesson. While I'm waiting, I have a basic fingering question that I'm hoping someone might be able to answer - I've searched and couldn't find the answer, but apologies if it's been addressed before.

    My question is about the best fingering for a basic minor triad down at the bottom of the neck, say F - Ab - C. So on BG I'd finger it 1st, 4th, 3rd (or 2nd). But on DB the 1st to 4th finger to cover a minor third at the bottom of the next feels like a stretch. So would it be played 1st, then change position, 2nd, 1st? I'm sure there are multiple answers, but any general guidelines would be a big help until I get that lesson...

    Dave
     
  2. I would play a simple F- triad like this:

    F - 1st finger
    (shift up a half step so your first finger would play F#)
    Ab - 4th finger
    C - 2nd finger
     
  3. You could shift or pivot, whatever is more comfortable for you,
    but the fingering is still the same.
     
  4. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Quincy, MA
    I would shift, pivoting is an advanced technique best used sparingly with strong, jazz pizzicato. Still, the triads should be practiced arco.
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Bascially, think of the the same shapes being available to finger that chord on a DB that are available on a BG, only the scale is about 9 inches longer and there are no frets. What most people find and agree this means for practical fingering purposes in the lower positions is something like the following: instead of thinking of your left hand as having four fingers (1-2-3-4), each playing a half step in the chromatic scale, think of it as having only three (1-2-4, unless you're Italian). From this paradigm, when you need to play an interval of a minor third or greater along one string, you'll need to shift your hand to do it.

    Good luck, have fun, and listen to your teacher. :)
     
  6. zeytoun

    zeytoun

    Dec 19, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    With the exception of when you have an open string for the root note of the interval, right? ;)
     
  7. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Naturally.
     
  8. zeytoun

    zeytoun

    Dec 19, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    So the OP should tune his strings up a 1/2 step, or have everyone else play a 1/2 step down. Then he can play without shifting. :D
     
  9. tinyd

    tinyd

    Mar 11, 2003
    Ireland
    :) I like the second suggestion. I could also insist that we never play any minor chords...

    Thanks for the help everyone - like I said, I'm going to ask my teacher all this stuff, but thanks in the meantime.
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    But you don't have to play strict arpeggios - just because it's a particular chord - obviously it could be a good exercise, but as we are talking about Jazz, then you can usually choose a way through the chords that flows and avoids nasty stretches ....:p
     
  11. tinyd

    tinyd

    Mar 11, 2003
    Ireland
    Absolutely - I was thinking more in 'excercise mode', but agreed - the best walking lines usually consist of smaller intervals with the odd big jump.
     

Share This Page