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6x10 vs. 2x15

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by ZiggyDude, Sep 23, 2008.


  1. ZiggyDude

    ZiggyDude

    Jun 8, 2005
    I would be curious on what some people thought about the differences between speaker enclosures.

    For years I have been using a 6x10 cabinet. (Ampeg 610 HLF) but I have recently been starting to mix it up some. The last few jobs I have taken various 2x15 configurations. In practice I tried a 4x10 and a front loaded 1x18 (both Ampeg SVT classic series).

    It seems that 6x10 cabinets are slowly starting to get popular - while of course the 2x15 is an old classic.

    From the limited experience I have noticed so far - I have noticed differences in how sound is thrown laterally across the stage (is the cabinet "Directional") and how they perform set on a stage rather than a hard floor.

    I realize that there will be variations by manufacturer and cabinet design. But, in general, I was wondering what the collective opinions were of these two styles of enclosures.

    Thanx,

    - Ziggy -
     
  2. I find the most annoying thing about playing a pair of 15's is the way they "throw" the sound. I find standing right in front of the speakers doesn't give a true representation of what the audience is actually hearing.
    They also have a real omni-directional quality which is guaraunteed to piss off any picky soundman who doesn't dig the "bass-wash" screwing up the drum mic's.

    That said - I dig their sound more than a 6x10 or a 8x10. Much more thump on tap. Sure some definition is lost - but whenever I have used them, the guys in my band always comment - where the bass? We can't FEEL you no more!
     
  3. RiseAgainst

    RiseAgainst

    Jun 4, 2008
    I prefer 10"s because I prefer definition over the droning hum I feel 15"s create. They just cater to my personal sound better. at that rate I actually am getting into 12" speakers, they're like a hybrid between the two :D
     
  4. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    It all depends on the cab. But 10"s can go 5k on average where your average 15" tops out at 4k, and they don't seem to beam the highs as much as 15"s, which is what makes 15"s sound more directional sometimes. I like both for different reasons. You can get great tones out of both. I hate mixing them together, but separately, 10"s and 15"s are both terrific.
     
  5. ZiggyDude

    ZiggyDude

    Jun 8, 2005
    This topic sort of reminds me of a decision making process I went through in 2001 when I got my Ampeg 6x10 and the matching SVT4-Pro head. At the time I wanted to upgrade from my PeaVey 1810 (later called the 1820) cabinet and the PeaVey Mark IV head that everyone was using for so long.

    The band I was in, though all seasoned club musicians, were in a real weenie mood. If they heard any bass on stage at all I just got complaints like crazy. Meanwhile, I was finding out that people were not hearing me in the mix out front – even when there was a soundman. So, I wanted a cabinet that would be directional and drill the sound out front but not laterally spread across the stage. I mentioned my conundrum at sites like Harmony Central and got a lot of really good replies.

    To cut to the quick – after extensive shopping I got the Ampegs mentioned above. The 6x10 did allow me to push decent volume and keep the weenies off my back. It was quite directional.

    That band is gone and I am now in normal bands that enjoy bass. I usually get told to turn up. A few jobs ago I took a 2x15 and they loved it. I was told it had a lot more presence on stage. One cab was “vintage” – an Acoustic with two Eminence 15s. I noticed that once I started getting pretty loud I was losing some of the definition if I was going quarter notes. So, punch on fast notes seemed off while overall rumble seemed up. The 6x10 also seems to be picky about wanting to be on the floor – if I am on a stage the low end does not seem to project into the room. The 2x15 seem to be less susceptible to this.

    Has anyone else had this type of experience? I know a 6x10 has more speaker surface area than a 2x15 – so some of this does not seem to make sense.

    I am going to be cabinet shopping in a few months – so – this is one reason I am looking at all this.
     
  6. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    The Ampeg 610 is built to be a low end tone monster, so cab sensitivity could be less than your Acoustic 215, which could easily account for the volume difference.
     
  7. just ssaying that i thought 6x10 was about the sme as 2x15 in terms of the air pushed. using eminence basslites for comparing, 1 15 will push an extra 21cm^3 than 3 10's. (or 215's pushing 42cm^3 more than 6 10's) thats peak volume displacement, so it takes into effect xmax.
     
  8. ZiggyDude

    ZiggyDude

    Jun 8, 2005
    OK - you are smarter than me.

    What you are saying is that the 2x15 has some extra air? Of course this is not counting ports.

    My general feeling was that the 2x15 (using modern Eminence speakers in a vintage Acoustic 406 wide cab) had the advantage on low end and wide dispersion.

    This weekend I am going to a medium to small size room that I have used the 6x10 before. It is not a "Loud Room" so the 402 might not lose the distinction and articulation it did in the loud room. Somehow it seems the 406 is overkill. I know how the 610 sounds there. So - wonering which cab would help this thread.
     
  9. what i am saying is the 2x15 will probably be able to push more air, so it can produce more low end. but that depends on the cab, the speakers (xmax specifically) and the tuning. how much mids and highs depends on the specific speaker. from what i've heard, the ampeg hlf's are quite heavy in the lows, so maybe the 2x15 would have more mids and highs, but that depends on the speaker of course.
     

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