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A simple one word answer question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Earthday, Dec 30, 2005.


  1. Earthday

    Earthday

    Sep 22, 2005
    New Hampshire
    I've done a lot of research and I'm ready to adjust the truss rod. But all the information I can find is a little vague, and in some places contradicting.

    Basically, the string is too close to the fretboard near the first 3 or so frets, and gets higher and higher towards the body. Am I turning the truss rod clockwise or counter-clockwise? (Of course in 1/4 inplements once a day (even though I think one adjustment is all I'll need.
     
  2. Matthew Bryson

    Matthew Bryson Guest

    Jul 30, 2001
    Sorry, more than one word - but... (quoted from the Gary Willis web site sticked at the top of the forum)

    The quickest way to tell if the right amount of relief is in your neck is to lower the strings.

    If after lowering the strings, the notes buzz only above the 12th fret, then there's too much bow in the neck. You'll need to tighten the truss rod.

    If after you lower the strings, the notes only buzz in the 1st 5 frets then your neck is too straight. You'll need to loosen the truss rod.

    If after you lower the strings, the notes buzz all up and down the neck, the neck's fine. Your strings are just too low.



    ...sounds to me like you need to loosen the truss rod - 1/4 turn counter-clockwise
     
  3. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    Sounds to me like you need to check the relief the correct way - you are describing action height. If you fret the low E at the first and last fret on the neck, how much space is between the string and about the 10th fret? It should be close to the thickness of an index card. If it is, then you don't need to touch the truss rod - you lower the strings by lowering the saddles on the bridge. If it is too much gap, tighten the rod, and if there is none, then you loosed the truss rod.

    - Tim
     
  4. Earthday

    Earthday

    Sep 22, 2005
    New Hampshire
    Oh I know it's the truss rod. I have the action on my A string as high as it can go JUST so it wont buzz at the first fret. Meanwhile the 12th fret and beyond are so high off the board it noticably affects my speed. And when i fret the opposite ends of the board, the middle is about 1/3 a deck of cards.
     
  5. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
  6. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    (Hey, you said you wanted a one-word answer!)

    Seriously, though - IMO it's best to start with a whole new setup, checking each adjustment in order. The Fender guide I linked above is a good one, and will get you all fixed up!
     
  7. one word: clock-wise

    (at least, I think that is what you are describing.)

    from the fender setup guide:

     
  8. Kronos

    Kronos

    Dec 28, 2005
    Philadelphia, PA
    Could it be that the nut is seated too low?
     
  9. Earthday

    Earthday

    Sep 22, 2005
    New Hampshire
    Again conflicting information coming from everywhere :meh:

    Here's another, probably easier way of explaining it.

    Here's my neck at a side view /
    the strings being on the right. And that's obviously exaggerated, and its much more of a gradual curve in that direction but the best way I could think of.
     
  10. fretlessrock

    fretlessrock Supporting Member

    Aug 8, 2002
    Corrupticut
    It isn't really conflicting information. Your action isn't a one-word issue. It is a combination of nut slot depth, fretting, saddle height, neck angle, and neck relief. You could have a problem with a high fret or frets, poorly slotted nut, or actual damage to the neck.

    All the truss does is manage neck relief. That is one part of the equation.