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b5/C?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Garrett Mireles, Aug 5, 2004.


  1. G--4-----
    D--3-----
    A--------
    E--------


    If I were playing through a Cmaj progression and I wanted to play a doublestop, would that be legit?
     
  2. Matt Ides

    Matt Ides

    May 12, 2004
    Minneapolis, MN
    are you asking about b5 (in Cmaj) would be Gb and C on the bottom???

    Your notation indicates F and B. F is a perfect fourth and B the Maj7 in a Cmaj scale

    Anything is legit. You are basically playing a Sus4.

    or are you talking about playing a Fmaj(b5)

    Matt
     
  3. I just meant if like, the guitars were playing Cmaj arpeggios and I felt like playing a double stop, would the F/B combo fit into that progression.

    Basicly, would it still count as Cmaj, aside from sus4 and whatnot.
     
  4. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    If the chord is Cmaj, you cant play F, as it is an avoid tone.

    Try E and B instead. or G and B, or E and G, or C and E, or C and G, or C and B
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Of course, rules are there to be broken and you can play what you like - although don't expect it to sound like a decent bass line! ;)
    If you want to sound like a bass player, you should be outlining the chord changes - you can't just play anything from within the key centre!!
     
  6. Matt Ides

    Matt Ides

    May 12, 2004
    Minneapolis, MN
    Ok...that helps. Well, I never agree the the 4th is an avoid tone...depends on how you use it and what is resolves to. If the guitars are playing arpeggios then you should stick to the outlining of the chord as Bruce suggested.

    But the real question is how does the FB double stop sound with the guitars...if you like what you hear go for it. Also, try some other combinations just to see how they might sound.

    Matt
     
  7. Thanks for the help guys. This type of stuff is the only reason I keep coming back here, after a day I always get atleast 4 helpful replies. :bassist:
     
  8. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    The 4 is an avoid tone in a major chord? Really?
     
  9. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    The real question is how does it sound against the other things that are being played. The context and the intent are more important than any of the so-called rules.
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Of course that's right - but the original poster asked the question : "would that be legit?" - which to me, says he wants to know about the "rules" - no matter how irrelevant they may seem in the context....? :meh:

    I mean, if he doesn't know what the rules are in the first place - he won't be able to deliberately break them!! ;)
     
  11. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    yeah, agreed, i dont really get all this avoid note rubbish, i think the only avoid notes are the ones you dont want to play!
     
  12. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    Go ahead then ....play a 4 against a 3 .....it'll sound like absolute rubbish ....its weak as pizz :p
     
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    I think this is a valid point in Jazz, as Jazz pianists tend to build chord voicings on 3rd and 7th and emphasise these notes, so the 4th in a major chord will clash with the 3rd - semi-tone away.

    In rock music, it's not necessarily the case, as guitarists - especially bad ones, tend to utilise 4ths, as they are easier to play!! ;)
     
  14. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Before you say you don't get it, go to a piano and voice a Maj7 chord, and play a perfect 4th with it. You'll see why it's an avoid note....
     
  15. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    OK, I sure wouldnt play it on a downbeat but as a passing tone it's fine I think.

    EDIT, sorry, giving up smoking (again), hellish. Kids, dont start :(
     
  16. As a double stop, it would be questionable in almost any situation. A tritone, as it's called, is very dissonant, so handle with care.
     
  17. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    Sorry, missed this one.

    yep.

    Except in the case of a Lydian situation. #4/11 is A-ok. Lydian has no 'avoid' tones

    And the 4 in natural Major is ok for passing tones, but passing tones and double stops held out in a low register are a different ball game.


    Im not fond of the term "avoid note" either, it makes it sound illegal, when its not. But its called it for a reason, ie it sounds crapola and weak if not used with caution
     
  18. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Tritones can sound great as double stops, depending how they're played. While I wouldn't use the one listed above (it's getting close to lower interval limits in that register), the always great G#/D at the 13th and 12th fret sounds great to imply the E7 chord. (the tritone is the 3rd and 7th of the chord...)
     
  19. Ooh, look at me, I use tritones. [/sarcasm] :cool: Good to know.
     
  20. Tritones kick ass for rock/metal

    I forgot I made thread...I come back here and see all you old men bickering over the facts :D

    "4 is dissonant/no its not" :D