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band treatment

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by Marc Piane, Jul 25, 2004.


  1. Marc Piane

    Marc Piane

    Jun 14, 2004
    Chicago
    Do you feel that how the venue treats the band effects the quality of the performance? Of course we try to give 100% all the time at every gig, but does that get effected by the overall mood of the players. I was discussing this with a drummer tonight and was just wondering other thoughts out there.
     
  2. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    I don't think there's a clear relationship. Much as I'd love it to be unequivocally true that if you treat the band really well you'll get an excellent result (cos I like to be treated well), in my experience an unpleasant environment can also lead to some musical gems as everyone locks into an attempt to show just how good you are so you can then have the pleasure of refusing to play there again. If everything is too cosy you can end up getting lax and complacent but when the adrenaline is flowing you can get very focused.

    I think the band's general morale level is more important than the specifics of the setting although again (alas) more pressure caused by difficulties can sometimes lead to a better performance. Even there, I don't think it's easy to spot a clear pattern. As you say, it's good to try and give 100% at every gig; for the rest, you'll just have to wait and see!

    Wulf
     
  3. Marc Piane

    Marc Piane

    Jun 14, 2004
    Chicago
    I ask because I am the leader of my group and try to act as a buffer so my musicians are happy. We are a jazz group doing all orginal music. While I agree that musicans can get complacent, I feel that generally I get a better product out of people when they are happy to be there (fed, paid, etc). Unfortunately this sometimes comes at the cost of my own treatment because I try the act as a buffer between management and band.
     
  4. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    If you know that someone is listening closely to what you play and going out of their way to set things up so you succeed (parts with an appropriate balance of stretching and safety, an enjoyable and rewarding playing environment, etc) that can go a long way to getting a good result - you've got the buzz of being watched and plenty of inducements to do things right.

    If you can keep it up, it sounds like your band are very fortunate to have you leading them. I'm sure it's not wasted although you've got to make sure you don't get so worn down that your leadership starts to get ragged.

    Wulf
     
  5. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    I'm used to being treated like the clean up staff. Some places are very very nice and treat you really nice. Some give free drinks. Some charge. Some chase you to play if they see one patron head for the door. Others tell you to tear down early if it's a slow night.

    About the only thing that gets on the nerves of band is the out of control drunk dancing spaz that comes close to taking out the drum kit, PA stands, mic stands and anything in close proximity. That is very distracting for a band.
     
  6. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    The club/band relationship is a two-way street; unfortunatley, some club owners don't realize this. If a club has a reputation of treating it's bands poorly, it will eventually have trouble booking acts. I've seen it happen plently of times; usually the owner will soon realize where the bear **** in the buckwheat, so to speak. Depending on how many bands are in the scene and how many are willing to slit their own throats, it doesn't always work that way.

    Before I joined my current band, they played at this bar in which you had to submit an invoice a week before your performance; it would go to the corporate office and then you would recieve a check a week after the show. (I know, that's a very strange way to do business, but this was some sort of hotel bar, like a Days Inn or something) The band was contracted to play a Halloween show. Without the band's knowledge, the bar hired an opening act. (Around here, it's general practice for the headlining band to arrange an opening act if they desire to use one) Both of the bands played. Our singer stopped in the bar after the date on which the check was suppose to arrive. He was informed that the bar was using another method of mail delivery, and the check would take longer than expected to get there. Our singer called on the date in which the check was suppose to be there; all he got were mail loops and voice mail; none of which were returned, mind you. The next day, the manager called our singer, and said that there was no invoice. He resubmitted it. A few days later, the bar called our singer again, and told him that they weren't paying the full amount, because "the band didn't play the whole night". (keep in mind, the bar booked the opening band, my band had nothing to do with that) They also decided to cancel the show that my band was booked to play that weekend. (Isn't that nice. :rolleyes: ) The band was never paid. After not being paid, and having to pay out-of-pocket expenses for the soundman, they lost over 1000 dollars.

    That bar couldn't book a band right now, if their lives depended on it.