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Basic Joiner set up questions

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Dec 5, 2005.


  1. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I just got new blades for my antique 6" delta joiner. They are much taller the old ones had been sharpened to death. I have to adjust the in-feed and out-feed decks. What is the proper way/order to do this in? Thanks ....Tom
     
  2. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    I recently replaced my blades as well, but they were a good fit brand new. (majorly 'scarred' the virtually new 'old' blades by joining a piece of wood with big ass staples in it :p )
    As far as adjusting the tables, what I did was set the in-feed table on the right to it's "0" or neutral point, and work off that to adjust the left out-feed table, using a level or straightedge, of course.
    I have no idea if this is actually the correct thing to do, but it seems to joint fine currently.
    I have had a re-occuring problem when joining where the very end (last inch or so) of some boards 'dropped', if that makes any sense. I figure this is definitely USER setup ERROR......and one reason why I'd like to work with/under an experienced woodworker someday.
     
  3. schuyler

    schuyler

    Aug 5, 2003
    Atlanta, GA
    the basic theory goes like this:

    1. set the new knives in the cutter head.
    2. find the one knife which is tallest when the cutter head is rotated to top dead center.
    3. using a straightedge, set the outfeed table to that exact height.
    4. using the same straightedge in the same position, set the other knives to the same height. this is important so the knives wear equally and don't chatter.
    5. the infeed table adjusts as normal, according to how much material you're removing.

    note: this all assumes that the tables are parallel to each other.

    some companies make magnetic jigs to assist with this, but the same principles apply.

    JSP - the snipe you're seeing at the end of the board might be because the outfeed table is too low, or the tables aren't quite parallel.

    have patience and good luck!
     
  4. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Thanks.

    "the snipe you're seeing at the end of the board might be because the outfeed table is too low"

    Yup this I did learn
     
  5. Hookus

    Hookus

    Oct 2, 2005
    Austin, TX
    Yup, properly set up tools should not snipe.
     
  6. Phil Mastro

    Phil Mastro

    Nov 18, 2004
    Montréal
    Uh, what is snipe?
     
  7. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Snipe is when a joiner or planer grabs the last of the board and digs in a little deeper than the rest of the board. Then you get really pissed off :spit:
     
  8. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    It's what we hunted as kids in the back yard :D

    :bag:

    R
     
  9. nateo

    nateo Schubie Fan #1

    Mar 2, 2003
    Ottawa, Ontario
    Not me. I convinced other kids to go hunt it, all the while sitting back and laughing at their gullibility.

    I guess I was a jerk, eh?

    -Nate