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Bottesini's Grande Allegro

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by Charles Shores, Aug 19, 2005.


  1. Charles Shores

    Charles Shores Commercial User

    Jul 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    Owner: Guitar Barre
    Hi guys!

    I've been working diligently on this piece for about 3 weeks now, and I'm really impressing myself with how much I can learn!

    I have a small problem though. On the first page, there is an arpeggio that goes up to the A on 4 ledger lines above the treble clef staff. I first learned it going up then coming back down an octave to keep it on the fingerboard because there is not notation for it to be played as harmonics. I've been thinking that maybe it's just assumed that it should be played using harmonics. Is it illegal to scan a small section of the piece for educational purposes? If not, I'd like to upload it for clarification. Thanks!

    There is also another question about the piece, the second page. There is a triplet that goes (C-B-C) then jumps up to the G near the end of the fingerboard then back down to another triplet (Bb-C-Bb)...is it as hard as I'm making it? How much would the judges care if I just played the G in the middle?

    Don't worry, I'll have a teacher starting the 9th of September :)

    Chad
     
  2. Charles Shores

    Charles Shores Commercial User

    Jul 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    Owner: Guitar Barre
    Anyone at all?

    I learned the first part, its even easier then jumping down an octave.

    What about the second?
     
  3. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    I may be talking out of my ass here but I suspect you're reading a "solo tuning" version. Take it all down to the key of G and see how it all lays out for you.

    To my mind Bottesini's a freak for natural harmonic arpeggios...
     
  4. Charles Shores

    Charles Shores Commercial User

    Jul 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    Owner: Guitar Barre
    I think I'm reading it correctly, the music says "E-Moll" which, as far as I know is the German notation for e minor. The way I play it now, with orchestral tuning, it is in d minor, so if i tuned it up it would be in solo tuning, and e minor.

    I'll just practice a lot.
     
  5. chaurett

    chaurett Supporting Member

    Sep 18, 2002
    Storrs Mansfield
    Hi Charles. Bottom of the first page in the Peters Edition right? Bottesini's music can often change significantly from edition to edition but this is the one that I learned. Anyway, thumb on the G#, 1 on the B, 3 harmonic on the D and harmonics from then on. You will probably have to press down a little harder with the left hand on the A since it is such a high partial but the plus side is that you can add a little vibrato by shaking the string if you want. The other option that I have used in the past is to play the high A as a false harmonic on the D string but thats harder to explain. Maybe the next time I'm in North Carolina I can show you... It sounds better on the G anyway. In general don't be afraid to use harmonics in the Bott pieces. It's so idiomatic, that was almost certainly the way he would have played it. Good luck.
     
  6. Charles Shores

    Charles Shores Commercial User

    Jul 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    Owner: Guitar Barre
    Thanks a lot! It feels good to be able to play something, but it feels better when someone else plays it the same way.

    That's the way I was playing it, except I was closing the D before the shift to the higher harmonics, that sounds easier because I won't have to spend so much time on the D.

    Chad
     
  7. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    Oh yeah that's right on the D string you've got a natural A harmonic to party on with. I want to remember that the Dragonetti Concerto ask for this too on the D string so it probably won't hurt you at all to get cozy with it.

    You know the E min key got me thinking...that G string natural harmonic arpeggio won't chart an Em chord but the notes would still be scale-legal. Neat, but don't know if this does you any good.

    But yeah I shoud be practicing more too LOL
     
  8. Illfavor

    Illfavor

    Mar 9, 2005
    DFW
    You're talking about the III chord in E minor, G Major? I hope I'm right, because I'm still really shaky on my theory...
     
  9. Charles Shores

    Charles Shores Commercial User

    Jul 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    Owner: Guitar Barre
    G# B D F

    i think its a G#o I don't know the roman numeral part, i'm not that educated in theory
     
  10. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    Well actually my thinking is sort of backwards from yours: for the C major scale, if you start it and end it on the A rather than the C then you are playing an A minor scale too.

    So for the E min scale, if you played it starting on G then you'd also be playing the G major scale.

    There's several kinds of minor scales and I don't know which one this is (harmonic, natural, or melodic? I think natural maybe) but it's one of them. One of the Mozart excerpts (symph. 40?) that is often used in orchestra bass auditions is a line that charts one of these minor scales perfectly...I think the melodic minor. Anyway neat scale!

    Remember the Em scale uses a minor 3rd not major so there's no G#. It'd be a G natural, E-G-B. I don't know too much about the roman numeral stuff yet, so if you told me that G's the III chord for Em then I'd believe you.

    O.K. I'll stop before I get myself tangled up in crazy theories and just enjoy those harmonics! :bassist: