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Connecting the chords

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by chardin, Sep 20, 2003.


  1. chardin

    chardin

    Sep 18, 2000
    I saw this on the Just Jazz mailing list (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/justjazz/) and thought it might be useful or interesting. Any comments?

     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I think this approach has definite merit, but I'm not sure about the part about just changing the key signature (was he responding to someone there?), but I recommend this kind of "pitch flow chart" kind of approach all the time as a way to rid your lines of ROOTJUMPING. There's a whole theory behind it which is kind of interesting if anyone has eyes for that kind of thing.
     
  3. TJC

    TJC

    Jun 28, 2002
    Los Angeles
    Interesting. I'm all eyes.
     
  4. TJC

    TJC

    Jun 28, 2002
    Los Angeles
    I'd like to read more on this, if anyone is willing to go further into it.
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I plan on writing more on this, but right now there's no time. I'm saving a marker in my mailbox for when that time comes. in the meantime, maybe somebody else could explore the topic?
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Ermm - I'm not sure what you mean - are you talking about concepts like "Guide Tones" - which I know is taught at Berklee?
     
  7. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Not really, although they figure into it. I'm talking about looking at key centers in a holistic way that allows lines to be constructed whose shapes and motivic content are independent of the small scale key/scale changes happening at any given moment. But it takes a while to explain.
     
  8. In a soloing context, my teacher thinks you should aim to change scale associated with the chord so as to be able to play any run, phrase or series of intervals and they will still fit the harmony (or conversly you will have the ability to be deliberately outside the harmony). Ambitious - not that much for a bass player as it is for horns, since a scale is only the chord notes plus the spaces in-between.

    But it applies to basslines. What Mark S doesn't mention is where you are going - is it the end of a phrase? what's the soloist up to? do you want it to sound a if its leading to more, or static, or resolving to a close? Doing the above you can stay within a tone or move as much as you want. Purists can get upity if a chord tone isn't on 1 or 3 but .... if it works - context is all.

    One other thought, every interval has an inversion, so going down in tones could mean going up a 7th & etc.
     
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Mike - name sounds strangely familiar - ever been to Jazz Summer school at Glamorgan Uni? As you are based in Manchester, it's the only place I can think we could have met?
     
  10. I find playing through the changes without thinking about the chords too much gives you a smoother feel. I think about the actual key i'm in learn the melody( by ear or reading or both) keep an ear and eye out for the frontline soloplayer and "turn it loose" with the drummer. It's more of a "homemade" approach to playing jazz but it does connect with the other players and swings it hard.
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think this is kind of a "dangerous" approach to advocate..? So - it may work for you, but I think this approach is exactly what causes people to get frustrated at their inability to progress beyond a certain level.

    So you might hit on a good line now and again, by chance - but how are you going to plan to build on this or develop those ideas?

    The other thing is that you are likely to repeat yourself a lot and only play what feels comfortable or safe - OK, but hardly challenging or interesting....?

    If you play with good players who decide to do something different with the tune - re-harmonisations, substitutions etc - then you are probably going to be lost or feel out of your depth?

    Overall, I think this is just a recipe to be stuck in a rut!
     
  12. I think this is kind of a "dangerous" approach to advocate.

    I like to live on the edge

    .? So - it may work for you, but I think this approach is exactly what causes people to get frustrated at their inability to progress beyond a certain level.

    not if you have studied all your scales modes inversions like a good little boy

    So you might hit on a good line now and again,

    maybe the odd bum note but you learn from your mistakes. It's improvisational for goodness sake!

    by chance - but how are you going to plan to build on this or develop those ideas?

    I sing them when i solo and build a harmonic line around the soloist!

    The other thing is that you are likely to repeat yourself a lot and only play what feels comfortable or safe - OK, but hardly challenging or interesting....?

    A minute ago I was taking chances now im a boring old fart....? C'mon man! make up your mind. Fact is most Bass players have signature licks they fall back on. eg Ray brown and his two octave third inversion arpeggio. how many times did he do that on a turnaround . That's something we all recognise.

    If you play with good players who decide to do something different with the tune - re-harmonisations, substitutions etc - then you are probably going to be lost or feel out of your depth?

    I look at the charts! If unrehearsed I try to simplify what I'm doing and build on it.
    I probably would get a little lost because i have I only been playing jazz for a year now. I would stil have a go and give it my best shot.

    Overall, I think this is just a recipe to be
    stuck in a rut!

    Sounds like your argument is very subjective.
    That's the thing. I merely explained a state of being when i'm intimately conected to the song. It feels like I am channeling and in turn doing my best to support the band i'm in. I don't proclaim that this is the method for everybody. I don't use this this method all the time either.

    I don't have the luxury of going to university so time is of the essense. what do you want me tio do? Shut myself off from the world? That does not mean i don't want to learn and better myself. I can't help it if I have a natural gift. Rest assured I'm working as hard as I can and learning with the small amount of time I have.arial :spit: :D
     
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    No - you're misreading - I was saying you might come up with a good line by some slim chance - but generally I think you are going to be playing the same stuff that you are comfortable with.

    And even if you did hit on something interesting - you have no systematic approach to repeat that or incoporate it into your playing.

    The odd mistake doesn't add interest - it just makes people think you're a sloppy player!

    As I said - you may be happy with this - but I don't think it is a good approach to advocate to others.
     
  14. No - you're misreading - I was saying you might come up with a good line by some slim chance - but generally I think you are going to be playing the same stuff that you are comfortable with.

    I guess you havent heard me play> i'm evolving> i'm not comfortable with sounding the same every time I play something.

    And even if you did hit on something interesting.

    - you have no systematic approach to repeat that or incoporate it into your playing.

    It sounds like you have been to one of my gigs or you aer insiode my head!what would you suggest

    The odd mistake doesn't add interest - it just makes people think you're a sloppy player!

    It depends how much fun they are having.
    They asked Errol Garner; (who could not read music)what happens if you hit the wrong note?
    he answered "I play it again.

    As I said - you may be happy with this

    I am in the meantime. I feel less stiff and antiquated.

    but I don't think it is a good approach to advocate to others.

    How do you get in the Zone?

    When peoeple are at a learning stage they can't just rely on sheet music.

    I see many people without sheet music and they cannot hear thier mojo.

    You sound fairly sceptical of peoples ability to find thier own voice. Django Rienhardt was a genius and he could not read music. It was all in his head. Do you actually play Jazz?
     
  15. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    If you play anything like you write - I definitely don't want to!! ;)

    Stop taking this personally - when I say "you " I mean it as "one" - but that sounds too formal - I am talking generally - not about 'you' personally!!
     
  16. Stop taking this personally - when I say "you " I mean it as "one" - but that sounds too formal - I am talking generally - not about 'you' personally!!

    Well I guess it's how you write it then!:D

    I love a good debate.

    You fail to acknowledge any good points I bring to the table!

    why's that?

    Do us all a favour and try and wite in a more positive objective way!:D
     
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    How about writing "coherently" - that would help!! ;)
     
  18. So Ray is at the turnaround, and the key is C; Ray plays what?
     
  19. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    contraman, it'd be nice if you put the quotes in quotations so we could know what you were writing and what was quoted without looking at the previous message. Right now, alot of your posts read like william carlos williams on a bad day.
     
  20. Believe it or not, he was the school doctor when I was a wee lad in Rutherford.