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Custom Rubber Tip for Endpin

Discussion in 'Accessories [DB]' started by OmNomNom, Mar 20, 2013.


  1. OmNomNom

    OmNomNom

    Jul 10, 2011
    Wilmington, DE
    I am wondering if anybody has any leads on individuals who do custom-shaped rubber tips for endpins? I personally want something ridiculous and would be willing to pay the price. Perhaps even a vendor who offers eccentric-shaped ones in stock.. I know double bass is a little more conservative with presentation (aside from rockabilly paint jobs) but I figured it's worth investigating.
     
  2. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    This is probably unspeakably expensive, but here's 3D printing of silicone:

    http://objet.com/solutions/post-print-application/silicone-molding

    Otherwise your best bet is probably some sort of a mold that you make out of plaster, and fill with a liquid silicone compound that cures without the need for heat or pressure. Molding rubber is actually a somewhat specialized process.
     
  3. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Fdeck,
    The link doesn't describe 3D printing of silicone. I don't think that can be done yet. They are 3D printing the patterns but using traditional rubber mold technology. I used to have a modelling business which involved this same kind of work. It isn't all that hard to do, but you need some equipment which you won't find just anywhere. First you make your pattern. You can use clay, plastic, 3D print it, or whatever, then you pour liquid silicone around it to make your mold. Then you cut open the mold and pour in more silicone or plastic resin. Both the silicone and the resin need to be "boiled" in a vacuum to remove any air and moisture which might get in during mixing, then you cure it under pressure and heat. The silicones I used would have good properties for an endpin tip, but the colors were white, pink, light blue, or even translucent, and I know of no pigments which can be added without degrading quality. Urethane resins come in almost any hardness and can be tinted, but the softer ones might not be tear resistant enough. If there is a university nearby with a big art department perhaps you could find a grad student with access to the gear and materials needed to do this and for an acceptable price. I doubt if you would want to pay what the pros would charge!
     
  4. OmNomNom

    OmNomNom

    Jul 10, 2011
    Wilmington, DE
    Very good point with the grad students.. they are a great source of cheap stuff! I live very close to the University of Delaware campus and know a few alumni who might be able to set me up.. I will try there. Thanks for the tip.
     
  5. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Robo, thanks for clarifying that. At a former job, we tried to do some of that kind of poured liquid work, and even set up a little vacuum chamber. I don't remember how successful we actually were in the final analysis, as I moved to a different project.
     
  6. powerbass

    powerbass Supporting Member

    Nov 2, 2006
    western MA
    would silicone be stiff enough? I think you would need a dense rubber like the kind used on the frames of cars/trucks for the suspension end stop or loading dock bumpers - the thick, hard black rubber
     

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