Gene Genie

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Mike North, Jul 5, 2017.


Tags:
  1. Hello Gents (and ladies xxx)

    I have an issue! Having been asked to join a Bowie Tribute band I am faltering on my third song in!! A simple one, Gene Genie.
    The main Riff on the Verse is it is it E-E-E-G-A-G or is it E-E-E-G#-A-G#
    Any help on this matter would be great!

    Hahaha soooo embarrassed. I mean both sound right BUT I think it's the two semitone one from G-A-G sounds rougher.

    And by the way

    Isn't Trevor Boulder a flippin ace bassist!


    Love and hugs guys

    Mike
     
  2. Have no idea what the original music had. I take for granted the song is in either the key of A or E and as the notes in the E and the A scale have the G#, I'd go that way. But you never know for sure what the original song writer had unless you buy the original sheet music.

    And as I have mentioned many times my ear is made of tin so I'll be of no help listening. My money is on G#, I think that is what your ear is telling you also. Go with that and if you do not get any fish eyes from the guys you know you guessed right.

    E Major scale = E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E
    A major scale = A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A

    Added --- G# is correct for the key this song is in, if the bass did it in G and the guitar did it in G#; the guitar is correct, join him.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2017
  3. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    That's weird. I was sure it's G#, and that's what the guitar plays. But the bass appears to be playing G naturals. Some of them muffled, but some quite clearly. Wonder if that's intentional... The G naturals get progressively more unclear as the song goes on, as if the bassist realized they were off.

    If I had to play this song I would just see what the guitarist does (most likely G#'s) and join that.
     
  4. Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
  5. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    That's clearly what he bassist thought, but the guitar plays G#'s all the way.
    I don't think it's wise to do that G against G# thing when covering this song. And letting the guitar play G naturals will sound very different.
     
  6. JACink

    JACink

    Mar 9, 2011
    Spain
    Now c'mon, this is talkBASS, the guitarist was obviously wrong!!
     
    natobasso likes this.
  7. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    On the video you linked, which was the same that I already listened to, the guitar play's G#'s loud and clear. Especially audible before the vocals set in but still after that. Besides that blues harp and vocals also use G#. There's really no doubt about that.
     
  8. I think the tension is great, and this happened a lot in the 70s in other songs, the bassist would use Mixolydian (flat 7) instead of the major seven either because they didn't know better, force of habit, or conscious choice for a bluesier sound.

    In fact listen around 3:07 and you'll hear a massive bass flub/clunker they left in the recording, but the whole song is so cool it really doesn't matter.

    Listening again, crud, it might even be flat 7 going up and major 7 going down. Wish we could ask David himself...
     
  9. Bullitt5135

    Bullitt5135 Supporting Member

    Nov 16, 2010
    SE Michigan
    +1 "flat 7 going up and major 7 going down"

    This seems like a pretty accurate cover...
     
  10. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    The cover video is blocked for my country, but I'm listening at half speed using transcribe and it really is loud and clear.
    The bass plays G natural up and down. At the start the guitar plays G# up and down. When the singing starts the guitar part is less clear, but I can make out the G#'s most of the time.

    Whether it sounds good or not is a matter of taste I suppose. To my ears it sounds awful (but I don't like the stones either).
     
  11. Bob_Ross

    Bob_Ross Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 29, 2012
    As the Stones themselves would say (on the original liner notes to Sticky Fingers, right after the boilerplate note about this recording manufactured to RIAA standards) "if you don't like the way it sounds, turn it up."
     
    Whousedtoplay likes this.
  12. Whousedtoplay

    Whousedtoplay

    May 18, 2013
    TEXAS
    This seems like a pretty accurate cover...
    [/QUOTE]

    No, it's not accurate! The bassist from the video just "stubbornly" plays G#.
    The bass note is G from the original video!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2017
  13. Whousedtoplay

    Whousedtoplay

    May 18, 2013
    TEXAS

    I hear two guitar lines.
    One guitar plays the chord/s (power chords) E and A without "touching" G or G#.
    Here is a short clip of that guitar line at a slow tempo.
    https://www.talkbass.com/attachment...6/?temp_hash=32d65942cf0bf8f1b4c9de4729492cf7

    Here is a second guitar line playing, kind of, single notes.
    That guitar plays G#.
    https://www.talkbass.com/attachment...7/?temp_hash=32d65942cf0bf8f1b4c9de4729492cf7
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 9, 2017
  14. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    Not sure how you want me to show it.
    If you listen to the video in post #4 it's there.
    For instance 0:04 to 0:11, you hear two guitars. One plays three beats of E with a distorted sound. Then you hear another clean(er) guitar playing G#-A-G# (that's the notes, not the chords).

    edit: oh right, that's what you said too. So what's the question then?
     
    Whousedtoplay likes this.
  15. Whousedtoplay

    Whousedtoplay

    May 18, 2013
    TEXAS
    The bass player is playing G. It's the Blues where we have Major/Minor 3rd's mixed and doing just fine.
    Here is the guitar solo with first played G and later G# notes.
    https://www.talkbass.com/attachment...6/?temp_hash=278e557e4e40e4322779326fb3aa7bed

    And the bass player is not OFF. He plays what's expecting from the bass guitar in Blues.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 9, 2017
  16. HandsFree

    HandsFree

    Dec 23, 2015
    Don't agree with you there. Major and minor thirds only mix when the major third is de lowest, or when there's only a 2nd between (or prime if you will).
    The other way round you get the minor 9 which is generally only acceptable if the lowest note is the root. Where here you have a minor 9/aug 8 between the minor 3 (G) and major 3 (G#). That is certainly not common in blues or jazz.

    In this case either the bass or the guitar is not playing what's expected.
     
    Whousedtoplay likes this.
  17. Whousedtoplay

    Whousedtoplay

    May 18, 2013
    TEXAS
    Let's wait for somebody else to comment on it.
     
  18. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 12, 2021

Share This Page