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I know very little, would this work?

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by Figjam, Aug 19, 2004.


  1. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/g=live/search/detail/base_pid/630048/

    Im not sure what the difference is between an analog mixer and whatnot, but this seems to be a good value.

    My band needs recording equipment. We are looking for the cheapest mixer/mics that will get us a good sound. We need 2 or 3 mics (instrument mics) and a mixer.


    Anyone know what would be the best way to save moeny and get decent quality recordings?
     
  2. Droog

    Droog

    Aug 14, 2003
    PDX
    Its a pretty cheap-o mixer but if you just need to mix a few mics or insrument lines down to say a tape deck or something it will do the job fine I am sure. Especially if you are trying to do it on a rock bottom budget. Don't expect the quality to that of your favorite John Tesh record, but you should have something that will get you a gig at the local bar. If you are going to try and do some multi tracking I don't think this would be your best choice, but you could figure some thing out I am sure.
     
  3. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    "Good sound" is relaive. The Yamaha will work fine for typical basement recording projects that are not too complicated. You can get even cheaper mixers (Behringer) and more expensive (Mackie, whose 1202 started this whole class of mixing board) but depending on what the end product is going to be it may not even matter. The quality of the mikes you use and your recording techniques (i.e. knowing how to set up to get the best sound from your gear) may matter much more than what board you buy.

    An analog mixer is just that, analog. True digital mixers are a relatively recent phenomenon. They convert the analog inputs immediately to digital (if they have digital inputs, they stay in the digital domain) so all the functions of the mixer (level and EQ control, signal routing, etc.) are really done in software. That's how modern digital multitrackers all work. Standalone digital mixers start at about $1000.

    An interesting hybrid is coming onto the market, analog mixers with digital outputs. Alesis just came out with mixers similar to that Yamaha that have USB ports so you can patch direct to a PC without going through your sound card first. I don't think they have started shipping these to dealers yet.
     
  4. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Basicaly we'd have a kick drum mic, and overhead drum mic, and a mic placed near the bass amp and one near the guitar amp. We'd be recording everything at once, just recording our jam.
    We'd later hope to record vocals over that.

    Would it work for that?

    EDIT: How are these mics? http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/g=rec/search/detail/base_pid/270102/ Would be used for the guitar and bass.
     
  5. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Sure, it will do what you want as long as you are not expecting it to sound like it was done in a pro studio.
     
  6. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

  7. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Are they expensive? :-/


    But yea we arent looking to have it sound like it was done professionally, just good enough that we could possibly make an E.P. with it, and give it to some friends and such, and have something to help us get gigs with and such. Would work?