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LMI truss rod issue

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Jul 22, 2012.


  1. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I have used over 200 of these and never had a problem. Today I went to turn one in a neck I just created and the Allen wrench stripped out the socket trashing the neck. Anybody else have this happen?
     
  2. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    If you can safely take it out of the neck, LMI will take it back I'm sure. As long as you didn't use epoxy you can still keep that neck.
     
  3. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    They won't compensate you for a damaged neck though.
     
  4. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Never had that happen Tom, have had a hot rod break, and an Allied rod separate at the weld, This I believe is one of the hazards of this job, and it sucks when it happens, hope it works out for you
     
  5. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    This may sound like a jerky comment, but - did you use the right allen wrench?

    I don't know what size they ship with, but none of my "normal" allen wrenches will fit the LMII rod. 5/32" is too large, and 9/64" is just slightly too small. Likewise, 4mm is too large, and 3mm is too small. Maybe they ship with 3.5mm? Anyway, I have used several of these rods, and each one ships with a wrench, so I have several wrenches lying about...
     
  6. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
  7. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I used TB 1 to glue it on. it is a thick flat radius Ebony FB a 6 string 18mm spacing 1 piece Black Limba. I can't imagine I can get the FB off without a mess. Yes the socket and the Allen wrenches they ship do seem to have a little play to them. I am now using my last one. I may need to look for another supplier. Guess I will start a new thread asking what truss rods other full time builders are using.

    Thanks all!
     
  8. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    I take it this is a glued on fretboard? Like I said, as long as you didn't use epoxy or some other permanent type of glue you should be able to warm up the glue with a blow dryer or an iron and remove the fretboard. Pretty standard repair. Drop in a new one (maybe test it first) sand your surfaces again and glue it on up.
     
  9. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
  10. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Victoria, BC
    lol! :D Markpotato, with respect, you should probably look up Tom Clement before you advise him on how to remove a fretboard...
     
  11. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
  12. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Tom,
    You could strategically plan for this too, perhaps slotting the rod end, in a way so that the rod could slip out and a small wedge of wood, to hold it in place on the open side, then could be chiseled out, if this ever happened again (That way there's no need to remove the fretboard). I know probably not exactly what you might want to hear right now, but could be helpful in the future. I know I've taken this precaution.
     
  13. With respect... he's in here asking a question ... none of us have it all together... anywho, 1 out of 200 is not bad...

     
  14. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I have had good luck with the Bestbassgear.com and Grizzly.com rods. (though I don't have near the sample size as you with the LMII rods)

    They are both less expensive than LMII also.
     
  15. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Despite having made a fair amount of basses I haven't had to remove a FB before so thanks for the help all. How in the heck are you doing it. I so far have managed to chip mine. How long do you let the iron sit on the FB before you start trying to remove it?
     

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  16. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    I've yet to do one myself (well actually, I did rip the board off a B.C. Rich.... without an iron....) but one thing I've heard more than once is DO NOT PRY the board off, gently use whatever specialty luthiery wedge you have (maybe a thin knife) by pressing it in gently as you go. Don't lift. Eventually you'll get it, It's worth the work. At the very worst you'll just have to do a little bit more sanding than you expected. Actually what would be worse than that is snapping the fretboard, but as long as you're patient, that shouldn't happen.
     
  17. Slowgypsy

    Slowgypsy 4 Fretless Strings

    Dec 12, 2006
    NY & MA
  18. Dave Higham

    Dave Higham

    Dec 19, 2005
    S.W.France
    A lot of people making acoustic guitars swear by the Allied Lutherie truss rods. They look like the LMI and others but work slightly differently. Instead of a left-hand thread at one end and a right-hand thread at the other, they have two right-hand threads, one coarse and one fine which makes for much finer adjustment. They are also made of stainless steel. the only drawback could be that their bass guitar model isn't as long as some others.

    Edit. Forgot to add the link.
    http://www.alliedlutherie.com/truss_rods.htm
     
  19. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Tom, removing a fretboard with an iron is pretty straightforward. 6ou have to work with it usually at medium high, and using a thin metal spacklng knife, a razor scraper, whatever you decide to use, and start working one end or the other, once you get the initial separation, you slowly move the iron and the blade to separate the board.
     

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