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"MOSRITE" hollow body

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by wold, Dec 1, 2018.


  1. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
    The thread is supposed to say"MOSRITE" not misfits Anybody have any idea on how to adjust the string heights on one of these. It's old as the hill but it needs to be pressed into service by this coming Monday night. ANY HELP OUT THERE?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  2. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    A picture of the bridge/saddle assembly is vital in a post like this.
     
    bobyoung53 and Reedt2000 like this.
  3. msb

    msb

    Jul 3, 2002
    Halifax,N,S. Canada
    Before you adjust string height you should determine the relief on the neck , and then adjust the truss rod . Then set string height , and finally intonate .
     
    4 Strings Good and Mordamir like this.
  4. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
    FullSizeRender.
    Unfortunately this is the best photo I can muster. The bass is 60 miles away at the moment. It is very old.
     
  5. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
    There does not appear to be an individual string adjustments for height.
     
  6. Mosrite basses do not appear to employ thumbwheels to adjust bridge height, whereas most other hollow body basses do. So,

    1) If the action is too high, shim the neck.

    2) If it is too low, get some hex nuts of the size and pitch to match the screws at the perimeters of the bridge, and a suitable hand wrench to match. Put the nuts beneath the bridge onto the screws and adjust to height preference.
     
    design likes this.
  7. Reedt2000

    Reedt2000 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2017
    Central New Jersey
    Looks like the posts on either side are threaded into the body inserts. Turning the post clockwise should lower the bridge and counter clockwise will raise it. Bass_Bridge.
     
    design and wold like this.
  8. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
    Hmm.... looks like I'm stuck. I really was hoping to get some vertical individual string adjustment somehow without doing ny modification or doing any neck shiming or nut replacement. Just simply don't have the time. I have looked however for updated original Mosrite bridges for the Celebrity to no avail. If I had the time I would consider taking the original off and putting it in the case.
     
  9. Reedt2000

    Reedt2000 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2017
    Central New Jersey
    Why individual adjustment? Raising or lowering each side of the bridge should do what you need it to. The radius of the fretboard may be built into the saddle heights already.
     
    JimmyM, ajkula66 and bobyoung53 like this.
  10. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
     
    Reedt2000 likes this.
  11. Reedt2000

    Reedt2000 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2017
    Central New Jersey
    Sounds like a neck shim is probably the solution.
     
    InhumanResource, Mordamir and wold like this.
  12. wold

    wold

    Nov 20, 2017
    Yes much to my chagrin. I will however keep searching for a drop in bridge for it. Until then looks like I'll have to us my 72 Guild Starfire1.
    Not exactly the correct period bass as the Celebrity but I suppose it will have to do.
     
  13. Reedt2000

    Reedt2000 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2017
    Central New Jersey
    Is the mosrite a bolt-on neck? A shim is very simple to do. You'd want it in the neck pocket, up against the body. You can use just about any really thin product to do it. Fender used a light cardboard. I know a tech who uses slivers of guitar pick (they come in graduated thicknesses). The goal is to tilt the neck back a little bit causing the bridge to need raising. It is non-invasive, not permanent, and something you can do yourself pretty quickly.
     
    Mordamir and Pilgrim like this.
  14. Reedt2000

    Reedt2000 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2017
    Central New Jersey
    Here's a pic of a typical shim. There are a lot of articles online for how to do it. Some folks say a full-pocket shim is better long-term. You want as thin a shim as possible to get the effect. shimpocket.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
    rufus.K likes this.
  15. Don't hesitate to shim the neck. It's something that every pro tech does when needed, and it is simply a tool to achieve adjustment.

    I find that usually a business card cut in half makes a significant change in neck angle. But it's free to experiment with shims.
     
    Picton, Marko 1, Mordamir and 2 others like this.
  16. Mordamir

    Mordamir

    Oct 19, 2018
    Funeralopolis
    The few examples I saw via the interwebs showed they had a bolt on neck. I'd just shim it too.
     
    Reedt2000 likes this.
  17. Marko 1

    Marko 1

    Mar 9, 2009
    N.E. Ohio
    I remember miscalculating in my mind the geometry and putting waaay too much in there, then kept taking out until I got to what you just said. :D
     
    Pilgrim likes this.
  18. CalBuzz51

    CalBuzz51

    Mar 11, 2016
    Seattle
    So I’ve used Stew Mac shims, they recommend a full pocket shim to avoid developing ski-jump at the end of the fretboard.
     
  19. bolophonic

    bolophonic

    Dec 10, 2009
    Durham, NC
    I’m not understanding the problem. It sounds completely made up to me. I definitely understand why they want to market their shims as different, but changing the neck angle shouldn’t create an upward curve to the fretboard.
     
    JimmyM likes this.
  20. bolophonic

    bolophonic

    Dec 10, 2009
    Durham, NC
    OP: If it was my bass, I would put a modern bridge on there. No reason to deal with hardware like that anymore.
     
    wold likes this.

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