My poor guitar

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Coutts_is_god, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Coutts_is_god

    Coutts_is_god Guest

    Dec 29, 2003
    Windsor, Ont, Canada
    So I have a strat copy guitar. It plays ok but the past week the thing has been crapping out on me. I know I can solder(sp) the wires to fix it but do you think it would be worth it? I have 250$ can, going towards my new bass amp. But now my guitar is on its way out. What should I do?

    This thread was made just because I'm sad that my guitar isn't working. :bawl: :( :bawl:
  2. I'd try and solder. If it doesn't work, get the amp then get another one man.
  3. No need to throw it away, you don't ned to buy a new one. And don't butcher the wiring in it...let's fix it properly. A cheap Strat copy like this probably doesn't have an onboard preamp (this guitar doesn't use a battery, right?)

    So here's what you've got: there's three pickups. These go to your pickup selector switch. On many cheap guitars, this switch gets crappy. Does the sound cut out when you flick the switch backand forth? Does wiggling the switch handle make snapping, crackling noises? If so, then all you've got to do is replace the switch. Carefully draw a little picture showing which wire goes from each pickup to each post on the switch. Unsolder the old switch, solder a new one in, and for less than $20 you're done.

    OK, let's say the switch was good. Next you have a volume knob and a tone knob. Volume potentiometers (or "pots") are also likely candidates for corrosion. Does turning the knob cause crackling or dropouts? If so, it's the pot. For $10, you buy a new pot and replace it. Again, carefully notice what wire went where.

    OK, the switch is good, the pots are good, what next? All that's left is the output jack. These are also common culprits. Does wiggling the cord in the jack cause droputs? Then just replace the jack, a few bucks and you're done.

    I have to ask: are you sure it's in the guitar and not in the instrument cable from the guitar to the amp?

    One last note on soldering: it's an art. Apply the soldering iron to the wires, heat them up, then apply solder. You don't drip solder onto the connection, this isn't glue.

    And too much heat is bad for switches and pots. Take care, heat up only as much as you need to.

    Since I buy switches, pots and jacks at electronics distributors, and not at the guitar centers (the prices I've listed are Guitar Center prices), it's actually much cheaper. Not counting the pickups, the whole circuit (switch, pots, output jack) would total less than $25.
  4. Are you a bassist or a guitarist primarily? I am biased so get the bass amp champ!
  5. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    Some good advice. most likely the pots, switch, or jack have gone bad. Very easy and cheap to replace. It is possible that the pickups themselves have gone bad, but it's not as likely. If you replace some of the hardware make sure you get the right replacement parts. If you replace a pot make sure to replace it with one of the same resistance. Not the end of the world if you don't, but it won't work the same if you use a different pot.

    With soldering, just remember solder flows toward heat.
  6. Coutts_is_god

    Coutts_is_god Guest

    Dec 29, 2003
    Windsor, Ont, Canada
    What if everything you said happens? :(
    Man, it was made in 1991. Just to let you know.

    Also I call myself a "Bassplayer" but I just love music so I like to play a little of everything.
  7. Stinsok

    Stinsok Supporting Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Central Alabama
    Buy a prewired pickup assembly and just drop it in. It will be better than what you have already and you can do it yourself.
  8. Coutts_is_god

    Coutts_is_god Guest

    Dec 29, 2003
    Windsor, Ont, Canada
    Update: I took it apart and cleaned it. It plays way better now. I used this spray cleaner my dad said to use.
    thanks for help.