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New bass and a dead spot.......

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by suddenlysane, Jul 20, 2012.


  1. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    I ordered a Fender Road Worn Precision and received it this week. I LOVE it. It is everything I was hoping it would be. Compared to my other two P basses, it stands out in a most excellent way (one is a 2011 MIM standard and the other is a 2001 MIM standard with American pups). The neck is wonderful. The tone knob is very smooth and precise and it is now the lightest bass I own (with the possible exception of my Ibanez). It looks amazing and sounds amazing. I am now a RW fan for sure.

    BUT....after playing it for a little while, I noticed that when I fretted a G on the E string it didn't seem to carry like the other notes. I tried to ignore it but I found myself hyper-focusing on it instead. The next step was repeatedly plugging into five different basses and trying to verify if what I was hearing on the RW was SUPPOSED to sound like that. I'm convinced that it is not. If it was somewhere else on the neck I may be able to live with it but WHY did it have to be THERE?

    Is there a solution or should I just ship it back and wait for another one?

    As a side note....For some reason, this bass and my little Ampeg Micro VR seem to really like each other. :bassist:
     
  2. That's an odd spot for it, usually on Fenders it's the C# on the G string. The usual cure for this is adding/removing weight from the headstock, but I'm not sure with the dead spot on the E string.
     
  3. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    IME, dead spots in weird locations are not usually inherent to the instrument. Sometimes, a minor truss adjustment or bridge height change can address it. Other times, a change of strings addresses the issue.
     
  4. phishaholik

    phishaholik Supporting Member

    Aug 20, 2005
    Portland, Oregon
    Try replacing the E string. A bad string can cause weird problems like dead spots and buzzing when there is nothing wrong with the bass itself. It would be nice if that's all it was.


    Michael
     
  5. M.R. Ogle

    M.R. Ogle Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 5, 2004
    Mount Vernon, Illinois
    Backstage Guitar Lab owner

    Yep. This.
     
  6. purfektstranger

    purfektstranger

    Apr 10, 2003
    Canada
    If it really bugs you I would return it for another. Nothing worse than listening for that note that never holds.....
     
  7. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    I absolutely HATE returning things, lol. I'm glad to hear that it may be something I can fix. I am going to finish adjusting the pups to my satisfaction, play the hell out of it, adjust the truss rod, play the hell out of it again, change the strings, play the hell out of it again, and if STILL bugs me.....return it on Monday.
     
  8. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    +1. I recently had a new bass that had a weird dead spot because it was fretting out at the 13th fret of the D string. This turned out to be a (visible) defect in the string, and went away completely with a new string.
     
  9. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    I am looking at the bridge saddles and see something that may or may not be affecting it. I'll post a picture in a few minutes and see what you guys think. When I set the intonation the E string saddle needed to be really close to the butt end of the bridge which made the adjustment bolt fall over (down) and is now contacting the bridge plate bottom. The E string end wraps are on the saddle as well instead of just the string itself. Not sure if that matters, though.
     
  10. meatwad

    meatwad Supporting Member

    Apr 9, 2008
    Smallville, USA
    This sounds odd. The E saddle is usually closest to the backside of the bridgeplate, but this seems a little extreme..
     
  11. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    DSC_0948.

    Would I be correct that this is NOT the way it's supposed to look? In my defense......the intonation is right on, lol.
     
  12. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    That is a little odd. What if you raise the action just enough to not have a tripod for a saddle? All bets are off, though, with the wrap crossing the saddle, IMO.
     
  13. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    I guess I just need to start over and see if I can get it set up correctly even if the action is higher than I'd like. Most obvious place to start, eh?
     
  14. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010
    I appreciate the info. I'll now be spending the rest of the evening playing the G string on five basses for HOURS and probably convince myself that they're ALL jacked. :D

    Just FYI, I weighed the 3 P basses and 1 J bass on a medical scale. The J bass came in the heaviest at 9.375 lbs. The 2011 and 2001 P basses both came in at 9.25 lbs. The 2012 Road Worn came in at......drum roll please.........8.0 lbs. Love it love it love it!!!
     
  15. solderjunkie

    solderjunkie

    Jan 27, 2008
    Nashville TN
    I "notch" my threaded saddles... it makes the string sit in a nice rounded groove and allows the barrel to sit a bit higher.

    slottedthreadedbridge.

    Nearly invisible once the string is in place:

    slottedthreadedbridge1.

    It also keeps the strings from shifting when you really "dig in"
     
  16. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    For my money, that G is all jacked up on ALL 34" necks. Even perfectly in tune and perfectly intonated, I never feel like that note is quite in tune. I have learned to ignore it.
     
  17. suddenlysane

    suddenlysane Supporting Member

    Sep 29, 2010

    I'm really liking this. Did you use a file, dremel tool, other?
     
  18. solderjunkie

    solderjunkie

    Jan 27, 2008
    Nashville TN
    I start with my bench grinder, on the edge of the stone wheel. Then clean up with a round fine file and smooth with sandpaper wrapped around the file. The whole job could be done with files, but would take more time.
     
  19. nubs

    nubs

    Mar 1, 2005
    Wisconsin
    this whole concept seems really smart, i like the idea. but when i real i start with my bench grinder.....i suddenly became extremely frightened.......me and my bench grinder and my favorite MIA fender saddles doesnt seem like a "winning equation" think maybe i will personally stick to round files, and sand paper..... :D
     
  20. Yeah I hate returning stuff too.

    If a new string or minor adjustment doesn't solve the problem right away, I'd return it. Worth the effort and aggrivation IMO.

    After all, what good is a bass without all the money notes, eh?

    Hopefully it's an easy fix. Good luck.
     

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