NS design CR5M questions

Discussion in 'Electric Upright Basses (EUB's) [DB]' started by Les Fret, Mar 26, 2018.

  1. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    I have a chance to buy a CR5M.

    Are some years models better than other? Did they change something over the years? And what do you consider a good price for a used one in good condition? including the Tripod and Frame strap system (not sure if I need that but it is included).

    I can not test it beforehand so I have to buy it unseen. I am a little anxious for that.
    Is there something else that I have to take in account that I might not think of?
     
  2. Used retail seems to be about $3500 US. I tried one in a store and, frankly, it sounded and felt nothing like a DB.

    Ned's a genius, but this simply isn't his field of expertise.
     
  3. Steven Ayres

    Steven Ayres Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2007
    Northern Arizona
    I've demoed the model and I'd like to have one, but the prices are generally holding above $2,500, occasionally down to $1,900. There are model variations, but all the basses called CR5M that I've seen are consistent.

    I can't really comment on what you haven't thought about because I don't know what you've thought about.
     
    Les Fret likes this.
  4. CryingBass

    CryingBass Just a Fool Whose Intentions are Good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 8, 2016
    I have a CRM5. I'm an old Eberhard Weber hippy I guess. It is not, IMHO, for anyone hoping to get the same audience vibe from this instrument as you would from a "real" UB. Scotty might not approve ( or, would he? :)

    But why would anybody want to do that? ( after buying one of these, not chump change ). For those wanting to dip a toe into two different ponds at once, it can be a gas. I play mine through 2 Berg NV115's via a Mesa Eight-88. When I clip the B, I blow out windows. In a good way!

    Got mine from the Electric Violin shop out East several years ago. Plays extremely nice. Batteries can be a pain to change. Many don't like the M-side of it at all, and I dial that down a lot. But for some expensive noodling, I am a very happy camper. Good luck with your search.
     
  5. John Burgess

    John Burgess

    Nov 28, 2011
    Australia
    The older ones have a selector switch to blend the 2 piezo signals, whereas newer ones have a pot.

    The older ones also have a design flaw in that the battery compartment is obstructed if you string the instrument with full length double bass strings rather than the bespoke NS Design strings.
     
  6. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    Thanks for the comments guys! Really helpful.

    Was thinking about buying a CR5M for a few weeks and since I actually had a chance to buy one I have given this a lot of thoughts. I was this close of buying it but today decided not to do it. I think I will really love this instrument since I also love playing fretless bass. But the reasons is that every minute I will practice the NS will keep me away my real upright. I really like the physicality of a real upright and I think I will miss that on the NS. Since I also like to do things with effects and I love the high C for bowing I thought the CR5M was a good choice. But since I also play other instruments like guitar and sitar I have to divide my time. It's too much distraction for me right now.

    It is this one. I think it is a newer one? for anyone interested you can pick it up for 2300 euro which I think is a good deal.
    GEBA-online | Marktplatz2-Detail | Kontrabass, Kontrabässe, Musik, Orchester, Noten, Saiten, Bass

    @John Burgess: really like your sound and playing. That's a bit in my alley and the direction I was going when I would have bought the NS.
    Question for John: what kind of strings do you use on the NS? and do you blend the magnetics a lot with your piezo? also for arco?
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
  7. John Burgess

    John Burgess

    Nov 28, 2011
    Australia
    Thanks! I use spirocore solos 4/4 tuned to EADG, then a mittel high C string. I always recommend the magnetic version as I always use some or all magnetic when playing pizz. No magnetics for the arco sound - the axis of the magnetics are 90 degrees out of phase with arco and only gives you the scratchy high harmonics. Not a very nice sound, unless it's for effect. If you know Eberhard Weber's arco tone, you have an inkling of what I mean.
     
    Les Fret likes this.
  8. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    Why did you choose the spiro solos over say the weichs? Are solos not the loose and isn't there too much tension difference between the mittel high C? I think most high C strings have a fairly high tension. At least the three that I have tried.
     
  9. John Burgess

    John Burgess

    Nov 28, 2011
    Australia
    There is a bit of tension difference the C and G, but the perception of it seems to be proportional to action. Ie, if you only have to deflect the string a few mm, then the differences in tension feels minimal. I have tried other high C strings like the pirastro flat chromesteel and found it to be too stiff. The spirocore is what gives that high C twang, like in Eberhard Weber's tone.

    As for the weichs, I would only consider them if you have some preference for the tone. On electric double basses I think the solos work really well, as they give a softer rounded tone, and a bloom to the note. If you're after a more traditional jazz tone then raise the action a little. You can enjoy the feel and tone without the usual penalty when the solos are strung on an acoustic, namely the reduced bass amplitude.
     
  10. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    ok thanks. I have to try that Spiro mittel high C some time then. I use a Permanent high D string on my acoustic upright now which I tune to D and to C sometimes. It also has a fairly high tension.
    Never tried the Spiro solos but I think they will too loose on acoustic, not sure though. I like the Spiro weichs but not so much for bowing.