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Original Material and Auditions

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by Bryan_G, Oct 21, 2003.


  1. Bryan_G

    Bryan_G

    Apr 28, 2000
    Austin, Texas
    I have been talking with a band that plays originals. They seem to be pretty well established and have everything together. I will probably be auditioning pretty soon and would like to know how to audition for this situation. I have played in bands before and have even done some informal "auditions". This band hasn't handed me a tape and said "Learn this," but I would like to be as prepared as I can be. I have a couple of their songs and figure learning them will only help me, but I don't know how well to learn them. I mean should I play all of the old bass player’s fills and stuff? Should I add what I think would sound good? Or should I just play the basic song, and not worry about it. I am not too worried about the attitude and preparation. I am pretty anal about being prepared and my attitude always seems to shine through for better or worse. This is my first time at trying to join a band that seems to already have everything together. I would appreciate any advice.



    ps. I realize there are a lot of audition threads already
     
  2. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Either decide what you want to contribute to the band and do that (whether it's playing note for note like the previous guy or taking it in your own direction) or call them up and ask.

    I'd tend to do the latter... although part of what I contribute to any group I'm in is being organised and doing my homework, so I'm covering the other approach to an extent as well.

    Wulf
     
  3. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Part of the equation is going to be the reason they're previous bassist left and what what they regard as the strengths and weaknesses from the bass chair. That could range from 'the dude was a genius - we want more of the same' to 'a parting of the ways due to musicical differences - the new kid has got to be different'.

    The worldwide community of bassists is unlikely to be able to divine the correct answer as well as a simple conversation with members of the band concerned :D

    Wulf
     
  4. VellaBass

    VellaBass

    Aug 29, 2003
    London, UK
    Very surprising they haven't given you a tape. You should ask for one,and have the conversation suggested above. If they see you taking them seriously, they're more likely to do the same.
     
  5. Bryan_G

    Bryan_G

    Apr 28, 2000
    Austin, Texas
    Thanks for the suggestions.

    Over the course of different conversations, I have gathered that the old bassist was kicked out because he wasn't professional and couldn't cut it. They said a few things like "He played bass, but he wasn't a bassist" ??? I guess they mean he just wanted to be in a band or something? They also said that he was missing practices. Listening to songs I have from mp3.com, the bass lines seem fairly solid, and aren't too flashy. I also asked what my level of involvement would be and they said that they want someone to be "another member of the band." So I take it this gives me some liberty to sound like myself? I guess if they don't like that I'm not what they are looking for :( .
    When I talk to them again I will probably ask what they want versus the recordings. Maybe their reluctance to provide me with an audition tape is due to them wanting to try to move in a new direction. I guess I will find out soon enough.


    -Bryan
     
  6. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    It does sound like they want commitment and involvment, which imply scope for creative input. Maybe as you work on the existing basslines you should listen closely to what the other musicians are doing and see if you can come with some twists which enhance the overall sound.

    Wulf
     
  7. VellaBass

    VellaBass

    Aug 29, 2003
    London, UK
    Sounds like you deserve the gig and you'd be a great band member. Just remember that it's got to be right for you as well - you're auditioning them as much as they are auditioning you.

    Everybody has to compromise a bit to be in a band but before you turn up have a very clear idea of what will make you comfortable or uncomfortable.

    (Hey Wulf will try and make your next gig. We're playing the Hope and Anchor on the 17th)
     
  8. If it were me, I'd learn the parts as is on the CD and nail it, then start to think in terms of what can I add to make it better for the song.
    If they hear you for the first time and you nail the tune like you've been there the whole time this will make a very good impression on them. Even better if you can do it without asking them for anything. Just show up and know the stuff cold.
    When I'm auditioning a player I'm always suprised at how unprepared they show up. I always tell them at the get go, it's your 15 minutes at the audition, do with it what you want.
    I have personally gotten more gigs by simply knowing the audition material cold.
    Good Luck!