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For Sale Rare American Standard

Discussion in 'For Sale: Double Basses' started by Matt Quinones, Jan 12, 2020.


  1. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    Price:
    $4800
    Strings:
    4
    Location:
    New York
    Extremely Rare American Standard in very good condition. It’s a shame to let this one go but I bought too many basses last year and I need to clear space and refill my bank account!

    This bass sounds and plays beautifully. It has a clear, focused sound. Each note seems to spring right off the fingerboard. It’s really a joy to play. Perfectly set up for bluegrass, strung with D’Addario Zyex strings, which can be changed out for spirocore weichs or Evah pirazzi strings if you prefer.

    Setup and sound assets aside, this is a rare instrument, a real collectors item in that it has a pre-war body and a 1955 serial number (1858), suggesting it was begun before the war, shelved in the interim, then completed when H.N. White Co. resumed production of their upright basses.

    As you can see it is a beautiful instrument. It has a commanding presence, both on stage and off stage. Yet it is surprisingly lightweight and easy to move.

    The Fishman Full Circle pickup is included.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 27, 2020 at 12:02 PM
    as606, Reiska, unbrokenchain and 2 others like this.
  2. What serial number is she? Nice bass.
     
  3. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    Right?! 1858 serial number
     
  4. james condino

    james condino Spruce dork Supporting Member Commercial User

    Sep 30, 2007
    asheville, nc
    :thumbsup:
     
  5. Yeah. I love mine. It has an old school vibe about it, very resonant, plush.
     
    james condino and Matt Quinones like this.
  6. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    ecacty! It fills the room with ease, and it’s super responsive.

    I believe it is a prewar body because, as I understand it, they were not putting a lining on the ribs (i.e. Kay basses) until after the war. This bass has more body than a Kay, it takes up more space, but it is surprisingly lightweight.
     
  7. Mine is a 1938 and has outer linings.
     
    Matt Quinones likes this.
  8. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    interesting! So either I’ve been misinformed, or else the outer lining was something they sometimes did before the war, and always did after the war.
     
  9. as606

    as606 Supporting Member

    Jan 25, 2014
    Kentucky
    Great Bass, I’m my opinion this was destined to be a “Cut Label” American Standard. That would explain the lighter weight to the body, no “American Standard” stamp in the pinstripe area on the top of the back below the neck heel area. Also no outside rib linings, as you mentioned, to my knowledge cut labels are right before the War, 1940-1941. That’s simply from what I’ve gathered from mine and from a good friend that owns one. Nothing like a American Standard for sure.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
    Matt Quinones likes this.
  10. I don't know that much about them but someone around here does. Great basses. They really move a lot of air.
     
    Matt Quinones likes this.
  11. james condino

    james condino Spruce dork Supporting Member Commercial User

    Sep 30, 2007
    asheville, nc
    My primary is a 1940, no cut label, outer linings (41 1/2"scale, D heel, new Condino neck!). Absolutely KILLER bass- I took it out for two rehearsals and then literally went home and sold all 4 other basses I owned that had been my go to instruments for the last ten years!

    I also have a 1938 that has the full label + outside linings (...currently disassembled). Either way, the small print is irrelevant. They are fantastic basses in all forms- the apex of 20th century US factory ply production basses.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
  12. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    You guys are really selling me on biting the bullet and keeping her, just in case!
    Somebody buy quick! Before my credit card company calls, lol!
     
  13. Matt Quinones

    Matt Quinones Supporting Member

    May 1, 2018
    It is indeed a cut-label. This is a new term to me! Is there more to learn about that? If production only lasted a year, this would be that much more of a rare find, and the ‘55 serial number makes this bass a true anomaly. No?
     

    Attached Files:

    as606 likes this.
  14. as606

    as606 Supporting Member

    Jan 25, 2014
    Kentucky
    This is purely my opinion from the information I’ve gathered. I know that a cut label in the mid 400 number range has a paper sticker in it that states it was bought new for a School/College in the fall of 1941. I believe they were made for a larger musical supply company and sold simply as a plywood bass. Its possible that cost were cut a little in areas like the rib binding and thinner, smaller necks, to save time and some money. These bases to seem to be more light in weight and a little more resonate to my hearing. That would explain the labels being cut and no stamp on the upper back, or anything stating H.N White Company, or American Standard on these Basses. I speculate that they were in the same years. This is my simply opinion. It’s possible that a body was left over and used later on. It’s the first one Ive saw with a cut label and 4 digit serial number. Either way, it’s a very good bass.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
    Matt Quinones likes this.

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