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Running 2 octaves

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Bass2x, Oct 24, 2005.


  1. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    What positions would you suggest for playing a 2 octave maj scale from a high A to a low A. It is a very quick beat. I've tried a couple different runs and there is too much flyin around the fretboard to play quickly and accurately. I'm hoping there's some technique I may have overlooked. TIA.
     
  2. Steven Melensen

    Steven Melensen

    Aug 2, 2005
    The best way to play accurately a two octave scale is by using the four finger per string approach (with the left hand). For an A major scale, I would play it like this :

    G ---------------------------------11-13-14---------------
    D ---------------------9-11-12-14-------------------------
    A ----------7-9-11-12-------------------------------------
    E -5-7-9-10-----------------------------------------------

    So you play the first note of the string with your left index, the second note with your major, etc. It may seem hard because of the stretch, but practice it and you will gain a lot of speed.
     
  3. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    Thanks, Steve. The run is from the high A (G string, 14th fret) down to low A (E string, 5th fret) but I understand what you are saying. I will try this today. I tried the 3 notes per string method but the octaves were too far apart and it usually was hit or miss moving between them. I also tried playing the high octave partially then running down the D string and completing the 2 octave run in the low position, but that was awkward as well. Your suggestion looks more compact without large areas to jump over. Thanks.
     
  4. adisu

    adisu I admit it, I'm a "user"

    Apr 8, 2005
    Israel
    I would go a bit different: (note symbolize the fretting hand finger I.E. I-index, M-middle ,R-ring ,P-pinkie)
    --------------------------------I - R - P
    G-------------------------------11-13-14--
    --------------------------I I M P
    D------------------------9 -11-12-14----
    ----------------------I R P
    A---------------------9 -11-12----
    -----------M P I M P
    E----------5 -7 -9 -10-12


    If you are more comfortable playing the A string than the E string you can play more notes on the A string:

    ---------------------------------I - R - P
    G-------------------------------11-13-14--
    -------------------------I I M P
    D------------------------9 -11-12-14----
    --------------I M P I R P
    A------------4 -5 -7 -9 -11-12----
    -----------M P
    E----------5 -7 -----------
     
  5. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    Thanks adisu. Playing around with yours and Steve's suggestions I came up with this:

    2 octaves A major aug4 scale:

    G -14-13-11------------------------------------------------
    D ------------14-13-11-9-----------------------------------
    A --------------------------12-11-9-------------------------
    E ------------------------------------12-11-9-7-5-----------

    These are the actual notes, I'm guessing at the scale name (AmajAug4)?
    But this sequence keeps you playing the same position, just sliding down (no long jumps or reaches) until you reach the E string where you finish with the low A. The hard part is getting back to the 14th fret on time as the run is repeated 4 times.
     
  6. adisu

    adisu I admit it, I'm a "user"

    Apr 8, 2005
    Israel
    You don't need to repeat the same pattern up and down.
    If it's hard for you to go up back to the 14th fret in the same way just find your easy pattern to go up the scale.
    Then you'll have 2 pattern , each more comfortable for it's thing (upor down the scale).
     
  7. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    It's not my choice. It's how the composer wants it. A 2 octave run starting on high A down to low A and repeat 4x. The temp is very fast, I'm beginning to get it, but not there yet. More practice. I'm using the open A string for the last note which gives me a bit more time to get back to the 14th fret.
     
  8. --14-13-11-------------------------------------------------
    ------------14-12-11---------------------------------------
    ----------------------14-12-11-9---------------------------
    ----------------------------------12-10-9-7-5--------------

    I know moving 5 notes on the e string is kind of convenient but if u can play

    --14-13-11-9- on the G and move everything else up it will be a heck of a lot easier than anything else.

    I find this is a good single octave major form

    -----------------
    -----------1-3-4-
    -----1-2-4-------
    -2-4-------------

    ever considered a 5-string lol
     
  9. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    Yeah, a 5 -string would be the answer, wouldn't it.
    Maybe I oughta buy one just for this run!
     
  10. adisu

    adisu I admit it, I'm a "user"

    Apr 8, 2005
    Israel
    I didn't tell you to change the composing just to use different pattern for the same notes of A major 2 octave.
     
  11. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    Sorry, I misunderstood you. I thought you were saying to add a run upscale to get back to the G string, 14th fret.
     
  12. WillBuckingham

    WillBuckingham

    Mar 30, 2005
    Expanding on Pizzacato's approach, you can play the whole thing with no shifts, if you use the open A string. That also makes it easier to get back up to the high a to do it again.

    --14-13-11------------------------------------------------
    ------------14-12-11--------------------------------------
    ----------------------14-12-11-9------------0------------
    ----------------------------------12-10-9-7-------------

    You could also move the four note runs to the top two strings and only have to play three notes on the lower strings.

    And a major scale with a #4 is usually referred to as the lydian mode. Very common in jazz.
     
  13. Bass2x

    Bass2x

    Jul 25, 2005
    SoNJ
    There's more than one way to skin a cat!
    And this problem/solution proves it. You guys have me thinking of approaches I hadn't considered. Just so that we're all on the same page, here's the actual run:

    Notes running down are:
    A Ab Gb E Eb Db B A Ab Gb E Eb Db B A
    from high A, down 2 octaves, to low A
     
  14. WillBuckingham

    WillBuckingham

    Mar 30, 2005
    Cool. Since this is really an A major scale with a sharp 4, or an E major scale starting on the fourth scale degree (lydian), It would be easiest to think of it with sharps instead of flats:

    A,G#,F#,E,D#,C#,B,A,G#,F#,E,D#,C#,B,A

    I really think that using the open A-string is the best approach. Even if it pops out a little, that's ok since you prollyw ant to emphasize that note anyway.

    By the way for people who say that High-C strings aren't useful, this kind of thing is an absolute breeze on a EADGC fiver.