"Sound of wood" strings

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by GBassLondon, Jul 26, 2013.


  1. GBassLondon

    GBassLondon

    May 29, 2013
    London
    Hi all,

    Finally gig my hands on a Warwick, which I've always wanted! OK so it's a Rockbass Corvette but I could never afford the German-made version!

    It had some old strings on it in the shop which were slightly dead but had that amazing sound of wood feel and really brought out the high end J sound too. I like a combo of cutting through and a woody tone so I whacked on some DR Hi-Beams and now it just sounds like any other metallic bass sound- not what I was after. Do you guys think broken in strings is the answer or do I need nickels, or possibly half-wounds, to get that combo of warm woody tone and cutting edge?

    Thanks in advance- Talkbass is awesome!!
     
  2. sotua

    sotua

    Sep 20, 2004
    Somewhere in time
    Try it again with SunBeams instead of HiBeams.
     
  3. GBassLondon

    GBassLondon

    May 29, 2013
    London
    Thanks! Would you recommend sunbeams over ernie ball slinkies?
     
  4. billgwx

    billgwx

    Apr 10, 2009
    Centereach NY
    D'Addario nylon tapewound strings will give you a woody sound, but you may lose the cutting edge in the process IMO. Slightly dead GHS Boomers have been sounding a little woody on my P-bass lately too.
     
  5. Those are in my three Warwicks, and I just love the tone. loss of cutting edge is not an issue to me
     
  6. Jon Moody

    Jon Moody Commercial User

    Sep 9, 2007
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Manager of Brand Identity & Development, GHS Strings, Innovation Double Bass Strings, Rocktron
    The strings that are on my Corvette Std right now, and have been for a couple of years, are the GHS Progressives. They've got a distinct bite to them without being too harsh, and really let the character of the bass come through.

    It's got an active set of pickups and preamp from Seymour Duncan, and that's playing a large part as well, but it all works together very well.
     
  7. iiipopes

    iiipopes Supporting Member

    May 4, 2009
    Tapewounds, or GHS Precision Flats, or maybe LaBella, and put a block of foam under the strings at the bridge.
     
  8. Ian_Flash

    Ian_Flash

    Jan 17, 2013
    As a "Wick user, I can tell you this: I've tried the majority of strings on mine for the same tone you seek. What I came to, and have stuck with for years is this: LaBella Deep Talkin' ROUND Wounds. Nickels sound "rubbery" on the Warwicks and Traditional S/S can be clanky. These DTB Rounds are woody and bassy, but have just enough sweetness in the top. The new version or Hard Rockin' Steels (Now just called Stainless Steel Series) are also amazing strings, but may be too punchy and less "woody' on a W.Wick.
     
  9. I've been using Sadowski nickels on my Warwick. I love them! Not too pricey either.
     
  10. Ian_Flash

    Ian_Flash

    Jan 17, 2013
    Sadowsky strings sound great. Did you try his S/S on the Warwick? They work great on the heavier Bubinga/Ovangkol/Wenge wood combos.
     
  11. I haven't but I've thought of it. I guess I have to now! :) I got started on Sadowski strings mostly due to the price and tapered B string and fell in love.
     
  12. mmbongo

    mmbongo Regular Human Bartender Supporting Member

    Aug 5, 2009
    Carolinas
    SadowskY. With a Y!

    Sorry, that just drives me nuts when people do that. As does 'Dunlap' strings, and 'Spertzel' tuners. :)
     
  13. It's fine! My last name is Lytkowski. Force of habit :)
     
  14. GBassLondon

    GBassLondon

    May 29, 2013
    London
    Thanks everyone for all the great advice!
     
  15. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jul 27, 2021

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