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Best Way To Deaden New G & D Flats?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by PolkaHero, Mar 20, 2013.


  1. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    First of all, why it took me 7 years to finally put a set of flatwounds on my '82 Walnut Precision Special is beyond me! This thing sounds killer now!

    Brand new set of GHS Precision Flats. The E & A strings are perfect right out of the package, dead as all hell. The G & D though are a little brighter which makes the sound unbalanced. Is there a quick and easy way to deaden these strings so they sound just like the others? I've heard about using butter or grease, just wondering the most efficient way of getting them there as I want to use this bass for recording in a couple of weeks.

    Thanks!
     
  2. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Eucerin moisturizing cream works really well. Playing with dirty sweaty hands works really well. Pouring non-diet soda on them works really well, but be careful of the electronics. Believe it or not, rubbing poop on the strings doesn't work all that well, so don't bother.

    :D

    The D and G are always going to be brighter and have more ring by comparison, though. Just sort of a thing about bass strings. You can stick a piece of foam under the strings by the bridge and that'll work out most of those issues.
     
  3. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    Thanks for the suggestions, Jimmy. Couple of those options sound pretty scary! I do have a foam mute, but I don't want the sustain affected that much. I did a search on here, didn't turn up much other than eating fried chicken and then playing. I don't eat fried foods.:cool: Someone also mentioned coating them with vasoline? Think that would work?
     
  4. lmfreeman9

    lmfreeman9 Supporting Member

    Sep 1, 2007
    Arizona
    Roll off the treble.
     
  5. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    Reverse "P" pickup so the D/G string side of the pickup is closer to the neck, not closer to the bridge, than the E/A side.
     
  6. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    That would require a re-routing of the pickup cavity which is not an option. This is a rare, vintage instrument. Not going to happen! Now if this was a cheap, MIM/Squier P-bass that would be a different story!
     
  7. bjabass

    bjabass

    Jan 10, 2011
    Mountain South
    Soak in barbecue sauce overnight....approved by Stephen Stills or so I have heard....
     
  8. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I've done it before. As long as the Vaseline's wet, it should work well. If it's not, then it's 50/50.
     
  9. Rockin Mike

    Rockin Mike

    May 27, 2011
    crayon?
     
  10. I would use your amp's eq and roll off those frequencies a little.
     
  11. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    It's not the frequencies...it's the ring.
     
  12. Rockin Mike

    Rockin Mike

    May 27, 2011
    Just guessing, but I think it's the combination of rust and sticky finger gunk in there that deadens them. In that case the salt & sugar in barbecue sauce mentioned by bjabass above would be just the ticket.
     
  13. tbplayer59

    tbplayer59

    Jan 20, 2013
    That would be for a different kind of "funk."
     
  14. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    I'm using this bass for a recording project and it will be plugged in direct. I suppose I could use it in active mode and roll the treble knob off a bit.
     
  15. Plucky The Bassist

    Plucky The Bassist ZOMG! I'm back from the dead! Supporting Member

    Jul 30, 2010
    Houston, TX
    If you don't like fried foods, go out and sweat a lot, then wipe the sweat on your hands and play the strings...repeat until your hands and body are dry as a bone. Believe it or not, depending on the acidity of your sweat, this can wear them out VERY VERY fast.
     
  16. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    What about rubbing them down with something like lemon juice? That's really acidic, right?
     
  17. Duckwater

    Duckwater

    May 10, 2010
    USA, Washington
    Thump n pluck on it a bunch
     
  18. mmbongo

    mmbongo Dilly Dilly! Supporting Member

    Aug 5, 2009
    Carolinas
    You just gotta find the right kind of poop.
     
  19. vickde

    vickde

    Jul 23, 2005
    Orlando, FL
    This question came up a while ago and someone recommended Eucerin Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment. I got a tube at the drug store, and it worked really well to dull down an over-achieving flatwound G string. It's 40% vaseline, with a bunch of other greasy-sounding stuff mixed in. I rubbed some into the string, then gently warmed the string with a heat gun until the gunk melted into it. Probably should take the string off the bass first, and be careful of the drip - you don't want this stuff on your carpet. IIRC, it took a couple of applications before the string was sufficiently dead to match the others.
     
  20. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    Don't rub grease from food products on the strings. It's disgusting and it is a myth. It will not simulate months or years worth of grit, nor will it flex the string into the "deadness" you seek. Whenever you're just siting around, just grab the bass and play up and down the D and G strings so they get more play and the strings will balance out naturally. Have you tried lowering the treble side of the pickup ?
     

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