Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by buddahbass, May 4, 2005.

  1. buddahbass


    Dec 22, 2004
    Pittsburgh, PA
    i have been a big fan of the brazilian martial art/dance for a while but the closest school was 300 miles away. just recently one opened up in pittsburgh and i am very excited to check it out. has anyone been involved with this or give me any ideas on what to expect.
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    Hey, Buddah.

    Just wanted to say it's spelled "CapoeIra". I grew up in Brazil and saw it being done many times. Unfortunately, I've never done it myself so I can't help you there. Best advice I can give is this: wear comfortable clothes.

    If you go, tell us about it when you come back!

  3. Just check out...Bernie Fokker(Dustin Hoffman) in "Meet the Fockers"

    He's practicing Capoeira in the front yard when first seen in the movie. :hyper: :eyebrow:
  4. jazzbo


    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    What to expect?

    Expect a fun and amazing experience. To truly excel at the art, you will need great physical strength in both the upper and lower body. A sense of rhythm helps, but that can be learned. Again, while it's not necessary, to excel, stamina and strength are vital.

    PS: How retarded was the plot idea for Meet the Fockers? While I enjoyed the film and laughed on occassion, how do to hard-working, open, positive parents raise such an uptight loser?
  5. Simple Jazzbo, simple. You, Dustin Hoffman, he...uhhh....sorry, I've got nothing.
  6. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    The training tends to be bit expensive around here. They basicly treat it more like dancing than martial arts, so it's $200 per month at a dance studio :eek:

    Perhaps it's more popular around your place.
  7. jivetkr


    May 15, 2002
    Ive taken a few classes. Its alot of fun, its a great workout & its set to music.

    I dont think that its a very effective defense compared to other asian martial arts like ju-jistu for example.
  8. You better have a sense of rhythm hanging around TB!!
  9. Friend of mine trains intensely. Its very physical and demanding, and you have to train for a long time before you will be able to do the more amazing tricks. Wait till you see someone doing push-ups in a handstand position - that takes strength!!!! :eek:

    The history is quite interesting too. It began in South America when slavery was still practised. The plantation owners were very strict, and the slaves developed capoeira as a dance to disguise the fact that they were in fact training in combat techniques. Its true that apart from the physical side of the sport, you also have to practise in the musical side too - playing one of the instruments, learning the chants etc.

    Great stuff!
  10. It seems pretty useless as a martial art, doesn't it? Inefficient use of energy. You never see someone try to use it on one of those ultimate fighting shows. Sure is pretty though.
  11. gracie Jui Jitsu :hyper:
    i got to meet royla not long ago, the teacher over here is married to angela gracie
  12. jazzbo


    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    I'm kinda with you on that.
  13. I don't think its use as a martial art has kept it alive. The beauty of the movements, as well as the supreme shape it probably keeps you in are likely the reasons people still practice the style. But yeah, I agree that it seems fairly impractical as a way to take someone down.
  14. conk97


    May 2, 2005
    redditch, uk
    i took a few lessons last great fun and the people that i trained with where very helpfully and friendly.

    Hard word but well worth it....and it could be used as a form of self defence provided that you know another form of martial arts and combine the 2 :bassist:
  15. Not exactly. Capoeira was actually originally made as a street fighting martial art. In fact, it was outlawed until the last 50 years or so when it was made into more of a "sport."

    I love the music that goes with it. And gotta love that Berimbau! :bassist: