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Fretboard stratch removal

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by GuzBaas, Jun 13, 2012.


  1. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    Hi, I was cleaning my frets and by accident (of course) I stratchet the wood (rosewood) with the 600 sanding paper :bawl:

    which is the best way to remove the stratch?

    Will #0000 steel wool do the trick?

    Thanks.

    PD. Next time I will cover the wood with tape...
     
  2. you are cleaning your frets with 600 grit, that would do more than cleaning, they must have been really dirty or crusted.

    how bad is the scratch, is it one line or lots of scratches from the sandpaper? the thing with scratches in wood or finish is that it has been to be taken down from the lower grit to higher, so if it is a lot of scratches from 600, you would probably have to do 800grit, 1000 and then steel wool. But since it is on rosewood, try to rub some fingerboard oil and see how it looks first ;)
     
  3. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    The frets were getting green.... :bag:

    I can't feel the strach with my finger nails, more than a stratch seems like a "mark" (maybe?)... to see the strach/mark you have to turn the neck in the direction of light...

    I used oil and a cotton cloth.. looks nicer but is not removed.

     
  4. the thing that I am concerned is that rubbing the spot with more abrasives will make it look worse if it is a tiny scratch to begin with.
     
  5. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY

    Eh, its just clean wood exposed now, play it on that fret lots and let finger funk build up on it. Eat fried chicken and work on the car before playing and in a few days it won't be noticeable. Warning: if you are partial to fresh roundwounds, this technique will require a new set after desired results are obtained.
     
  6. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    LOL :D

    I use flatwounds!

    HELP! :help:
     
  7. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    I dunno...?

    Again... is not very deep, I can't even feel the "stratch"..
     
  8. if you can't feel it then you can try steel wool. Picture would be nice.
     
  9. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    Here's the pic...

    [​IMG]

    it was very difficult for the camera to capture the mark.

    I have synthetic #0000 steel wool but I think that I will need the real thing... what you say?
     
  10. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    bump! help...?
     
  11. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY

    Steel wool is messy; if the fine dust gets on your pickups, you'll never get it off. Start with 1000 grit paper then 1200, etc. If that is not good,get micro sanding film. You can get it on eBay, some craft or hobby shops (used to sand plastic models), Stewart Macdonald (pricey).
     
  12. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    That won't damage my fretboard?

    I'll try with the 1000 and 1200 sanding grit.. any precautions?

     
  13. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    I'd leave it. Playing the bass will also provide friction. Don't obsess over a scratch which will self-correct with enough playing.

    If you feel really compulsive, 1000+ grit sandpaper would be OK (2000 better), but you'll have to use it VERY lightly. Don't create a dip in the fretboard...because yes, you can damage it.
     
  14. those look pretty deep to me :( it's just like I was thinking: 1000 grit may not take it off since it was made with 600.
     
  15. JLS

    JLS

    Sep 12, 2008
    Albuquerque, NM
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    If I were you, I'd quit while I was ahead.

    I use 0000 steel wool for cleaning/polishing fingerboards, blue masking tape on the pickups. Freehanding 600g paper ain't the way to do it.
     
  16. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY

    Really, I agree that you leave It, finger oils and friction will lessen it with time. Like Pilgrim said before you may create a dip in the board, not cool.
     
  17. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    True.
     
  18. GuzBaas

    GuzBaas

    Oct 10, 2008
    London
    OK, I'll have to live with my error....
     
  19. It will probably fade out once the rosewood oils come back to the surface, and grime fills the scratches in
     

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