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Had an accident now I can't play

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Simon Johns, Sep 4, 2018.


  1. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    Here's the story: I fell over and slashed open the heel of my right hand. I think I also damaged my shoulder and neck too on the way down.

    Now I have almost no strength or fine motor movement in my right arm or fingers. I also find it very hard to type, write and even do up my flies! I sought treatment and got the all clear on nerve damage and disk herniation. Physio has done nothing and now I'm left scratching my head – with my left hand!

    I can play slow, simple riffs for a short while but then my right arm just runs outta steam.

    It feels like my playing days are over.

    Anyone else experienced similar?
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
    Bassbeater likes this.
  2. kesslari

    kesslari Groovin' with the Fusion Cats Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2007
    Santa Cruz Mtns, California
    Lark in the Morning Instructional Videos; Audix Microphones
    I haven’t but that sounds bad.
    If there’s no nerve damage, maybe try physical therapy.
    Good luck!
     
    MattZilla likes this.
  3. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Change doctors.
     
    mbelue, Stumbo, Simon Johns and 2 others like this.
  4. It can take a long time to come back from soft tissue injuries, and there is no guarantee you'll get back to 100%. Sorry this happened to you.

    I was once shoveling snow and the shovel got caught on a crack. I hit it with enough force to my right hand that the thumb and large muscle went numb for a few hours. When it finally calmed down there was a mysterious lump in my palm, some kind of fibroma or ganglion (which is still there years later). My pick skills (which used to be pretty proficient on guitar, mandolin, and bass), and my fingerpicking on guitar (hybrid picking, classical stylings, and Travis/Atkins picking) have never fully recovered. I'll always be about 60-70% of what I was before the freak accident. And of course, medical science can only get you back so far.

    Don't give up on the therapy and playing. Everyone's recovery is unique. My guitar player once lost nearly complete use of his right arm and hand from repetitive motion injuries. He was a monster shredder, had an insane practice regimen, and paid the price. Therapy only got him back so far, but he researched it and created his own regimen which helped even more. He may not be 100%, but he's back to being a damn fine guitar player capable of licks that will make your head spin.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
    MattZilla, Bassbeater and Simon Johns like this.
  5. Bassbeater

    Bassbeater Guest

    Sep 9, 2001
    This.

    I had a pretty serious spinal injury and felt the same about it being "over". It took me about a year of core muscle rebuilding to get back to basic normalcy, and about 5 to get it really under control.
    Be patient and don't quit your therapy regimen. Buy a cheap synth or something to keep you from going nuts in the meantime.
    Stay positive!
     
  6. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    Thanks for all the encouragement guys. It's been really frustrating so far, but you're right about keeping up with therapy. I'm also bone idle.
     
    Bassbeater likes this.
  7. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    I'm on my second. But you're right.
     
    Bassbeater likes this.
  8. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    Sorry to hear that dude
     
  9. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    There's a one armed man on here who plays gigs. He hammers notes on fretless acoustics. The first time I saw him playing in a video I thought to myself “who does he think he is? Stop hammering and play the bass.“

    Anyway, you should see another doctor and worse case scenario, you could adapt.
     
    MattZilla, Gaolee and Simon Johns like this.
  10. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    Talk to your doctor about a reasonable time table to return to normal. If he/she doesn't have an answer, get to a new doctor. Do exactly what they tell you to do - don't rush it. When I was in my 30s, I played baseball, and needed rotator cuff surgery. The doctor said there would be good days during recovery, but not to throw a ball for a year. I didn't listen. I used to be able to hit 80mph - when I came back, I couldn't hit 60 with a tailwind.
     
  11. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    Cheers for the advice. Yeah, my doctor is very helpful and really wants to treat the problem, but I'm finding her regimen isn't doing much and it's costing me lots of money. I don't think she's diagnosed the problem fully, and is concentrating on my hand rather than the whole arm.
     
  12. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    Then get to another doctor.
     
  13. FunkHead

    FunkHead Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    Maybe Pick style would be easier?? It's worth a try.
     
    SteveCS and Simon Johns like this.
  14. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    How long ago? It might still be early doors...
     
    Simon Johns likes this.
  15. bolophonic

    bolophonic Supporting Member

    Dec 10, 2009
    Durham, NC
    Brother, I have accumulated a long list of injuries and physical setbacks, repetitive stress problems, ergonomic maladies. It just takes time, in my experience. And a reasonable expectation of how a setback will effect the end result with regards to redeveloping your technique. Having a dedicated body work practitioner is a major plus.
     
    Simon Johns likes this.
  16. Tom Bomb

    Tom Bomb Hypocognitive Supporting Member

    Apr 23, 2014
    That's a shame. Sorry you're struggling, Mr. Johns. Wishing you well. Fight the good fight :)
     
    Simon Johns likes this.
  17. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    Ah, picking is the problem. I can't suspend my arm above the body to play rapid notes. Same goes for when I play guitar.
     
  18. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    It's been been about a year. Had about 2 months of physio, including electro therapy, dry needling, massage, some meds. No dice.
     
  19. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    Wow, that's pretty serious. This might sound crazy, but have you considered playing a Chapman Stick? It sounds like your left hand is still good, whuch covers the bass part easily. The right hand kinda hangs but supported in a natural position and the movements are very low impact. You may find you have just enough there to work with, but if not you still get to play bass, and potentially a whole lot more...
     
    Simon Johns likes this.
  20. Simon Johns

    Simon Johns

    Nov 20, 2017
    Istanbul
    That's a nice suggestion, but I don't think the music my group plays suits a Chapman stick. And I'd get some serious ribbing
     
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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