MZ-N707 Minidisc

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by Razor, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. Razor


    Sep 22, 2002
    Maybe some of you MD guys/gals can help. I browsed the existing threads and wasn't able to find the answer.

    I just got a Sony MZ-N707 MD player...I got it fairly cheap and it seems to work just fine although I am stumped on a couple of issues...

    1. The input volume, no matter how highly I adjust the record volume, just isn't that loud. Any ideas on increasing it? I've tried going direct with a mic and also running a line out of a mixer into it. I'm thinking now it might just need a good preamp in between the MD and the mic to get the input a little hotter.

    2. Does this model MD have the ability to transfer recorded material (band practice) to the hard drive on my computer? It has the included USB cable and I installed the software (Jukebox ver 2.2) but the Check In/Check Out function has me believeing now the only way to transfer files to the computer is if you originally got them from the computer in the first place.

    Any help is appreciated.
  2. Here's a useful resource if you haven't found it already:

    On the R909 which I have there's a mic sensitivity switch which boosts the input signal depending on whether you're using a powered mic or not. That coupled with the manual volume control seems to get a decent signal. However I've had a quick look at the manual for the N707 and it doesn't seem to have this option. Are you using a powered mic? If not then a mic preamp would seem the best solution.

    I believe the NetMD protocol only allows you to transfer files from PC to MD via USB and not the other way. You'll need to connect your MD to the line input of the PC as though it was a regular analogue piece of equipment.
  3. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    If you're using the "line in", you need a hot signal. If you plug the mics into the "line in", you'll get a very low-level recording.

    The "mic in" is designed with much more boost; ordinarily, plugging your mics into here will give a decent level. If the mics are unpowered, however, it may be easy to overload the recording (distortion).

    If you decide to use one of those mic power / bass rolloff boxes, however (I do), they boost the signal substantially; in that case, you plug the mics into the mic power box, and the output of the box into the "line in". Then set your levels on the MD unit. This is certainly the best method; of course, it costs more.

    Might help if you tell us what type of mics you're using (model number, if you have it).

    Nope; no MD's do, for the most part, although the new Hi-MD units do allow some uploading. That USB port on your MD is one-way, only *to* the unit - not *from* it, as MKS said. The only way to get your recordings to the hard drive is to connect the headphone out to your sound card's line in, and play them while capturing the input, in real time, to a file in your format of choice (using something like Audacity or MusicMatch).
  4. Razor


    Sep 22, 2002
    You guys are totally helping me out and answering my questions left and right!!! Thanks very much!!

    I used it in a number of different ways trying to find something that worked with a decent signal. I used a Shure SM57 and SM58 for the mic's and for the line level I came out of the line out on two different mixers.

    The hottest signal came from using an SM58 going into the mic in jack, I think the impedence was probably off because I came off the mic with an XLR to 1/4" cable. In you all's opinion/experience..what's a good, inexpensive little pre that would do the job? And suggestions if I wanted to use multiple mic's so I could adjust the input for each mic going into the MD.

    This truly seems like a neat little gadget...I just need to find out the tricks to recording with it. Ideally I would love to get 2/3 decent recording mic's and a small 4-6 channel mixer that I could plug the left/right outputs into a single, stereo 3.5 mm into the line level and go from there.

    As for the soundcard...that makes sense. Any idea on where to look for the software recommended?

    If any of this was in the above link sorry...I was so excited you guys had pointed and direct answers I automatically began responding. :D
  5. I use a little boundary mic (Audio Technica ATR97) which costs around $50 or so. It's powered which means that it gives a good signal. It's also omnidirectional which means it picks up all kinds of sounds around it and can be susceptible to rumbles and clicks... Not the best for recording your band - but great for recording conferences, recitals etc.

    Audacity is at

    That's probably the best bet...
  6. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    Hmmmm.... gotta admit, you're losing me with the SM57's and SM58's.... that's something I haven't tried...... and although the Shures are a solid vocal mic, I don't know about using them for full-range.....

    If you want to use multiple mics, then yep, you need a mixer and a line out.....

    But for just recording practice, all I do is tape some stereo mics to the wall, and run 'em through a preamp box..... stuff like you find on these pages:

    If you're interested, PM me with an Email address, and I'll send you a sample..... recorded with mics, preamp and MD, then played into the "line in" on the PC and captured with Audacity....
  7. i use a sony mini stereo condenser mic. works great. it uses phantom power from the mzn707 so try to keeothe recorder plugged in toits charger while recording. then the hheadphone out to the line in on ur pc. when recording i use 7506 sonys to set up the level. then leave it.