Next Thing to Buy for Recording

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by apkbass, Apr 28, 2012.


  1. apkbass

    apkbass

    Feb 26, 2012
    I have a small amount of recording equipment that I use to record my band and myself. It's all centered around a Tascam DP-008 Pocketstudio, which I run my bass and guitars direct into. I have two Behringer C-2 condenser mics that I use to record drums and vocals. As you can see, it is a very minimalist setup, but I'm only 14 so my budget is tight. I want to know what the next investment for my home studio should be. What I really want to work on is improving sound quality. I want the same sound that comes out of my amps to go into my recordings, because now the bass always comes out dull in recordings, and the guitar (I run it through my amp and use a line out) sounds like overdistorted crap. I hear about all these things like DI boxes (which I am not very familiar with) that will improve studio sound, but I am also considering a computer interface, since I have Mixcraft software that has gone unused. So the real question is: should I buy things to improve the sound quality when running into the 8-track, or should I shift my focus onto using the computer more often?
     
  2. DuraMorte

    DuraMorte

    Mar 3, 2011
    Can you digitally transfer the files from the Tascam to your computer? If so, buy more mics. A good drum mic pack will run you about $600, and will have a few multipurpose mics. The Audix DP5-A pack has a kick mic, snare mic (which is also a great guitar cab mic) and three tom mics. Combined with the pair of Behringer mics you already have, that's a great way to get very usable recordings. Use the Behr's for vocals and drum overheads, use the I5 for guitar cab, direct in your bass, and you'll be rockin'. Later, upgrade to a pair of small-diaphragm condensers for drum overheads, and a good large-diaphragm condenser for vocals, and you'll be set on mics.
     
  3. thtbassloser

    thtbassloser

    Aug 28, 2010
    I would always avoid using the line out on a guitar amp as you probably noticed they sound terrible XD but on a bass amp there not bad, a DI box basically acts as a way for you to get a dry signal out of an instrument, usually only used for basses or keyboards, you plug your bass into the DI box, then theres an output to go to your amp, and then also an xlr out to go to your mixing board. Get a mic on that guitar cab.
     
  4. Slapstyle

    Slapstyle

    Dec 3, 2009
    Maine
    I'd start with a couple of Shure SM-58's. Fine for vocals, excellent on guitar amps, good for bass amps too. They are dynamic mics (not condenser) so they deal better with high volume at close range without distortion. MXR makes some decent, inexpensive condenser mics. I often use condenser for vocals, but rarely for close micing guitar, sometimes a few feet back from the amp to support the 58 at close range. Behringer mics are junk, but I like their mixers and di boxes. Shure makes a good drum mic kit, but with only 8 tracks, you'll probably have to track the drums first, then the other instruments. You can easily use 8 tracks just on drums.
     
  5. Slapstyle

    Slapstyle

    Dec 3, 2009
    Maine
    Just checked out the Shure DMK57-52 kit for drum miking. Not sure if I'm allowed to link to a retailer or not but if you google it you can find it. Kit costs about $400. It's got a Beta 52 which is an excellent kick drum mic, 3 tom mics which I've never tried and cant speak to their quality, but I'm sure they're fine for toms, and 3 SM-57's, which is virtually the same as an SM-58, which I recommended previously. If you can float it, I'd go with something like this, using the kick and tom mics on the kit, 1 of the 57s on the snare, and the behringers as overhead cymbal mics. Then you've got 2 more 57's. 1 for vocals, and one for the guitar cab. Then you'll want to go direct with the bass, which you may or may not need a direct box for. If your 8 track supports instrument level inputs, you can just plug straight in to that, but if not you'll need a di box or a line out of a bass amp. I think this is about the cheapest and easiest way to get a whole recording mic setup of good quality. There's plenty of other stuff out there that will work, but this is what I would suggest as a first move. Then I'd look at some more condensers, and pencil mics for cymbals, perhaps a computer interface. I wouldn't say I'm an "expert" but I did spend 4 years of college studying audio engineering, earning my Bachelors degree in it. I've been a professional recording engineer for the last 7 years or so, and an amateur for many years prior to that. If $400 is way out of your budget, I'm not quite sure what my next move would be. Maybe to not make a move, and save up some more money. Of course, there's ebay and craigslist, but you're taking your chances there.
     
  6. Jonyak

    Jonyak

    Oct 2, 2007
    Ottawa, Ont
    You can never have too many SM57's.
     
  7. Slapstyle

    Slapstyle

    Dec 3, 2009
    Maine
    Damn Skippy!!!!
     
  8. Jonyak

    Jonyak

    Oct 2, 2007
    Ottawa, Ont
    I was just comparing frquency response of the beta 57 and the SM57, and it looks like that beta has a better bass response at certain distances, so it might be a good start if you are looking for a mic to record a bass amp.
     
  9. apkbass

    apkbass

    Feb 26, 2012
    Thanks for all the advice! Just ordered a new shipment of recording stuff. Got an MXL 990 (large diaphragm) and 991 (small) combo, and a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB interface. And after doing some test recording, I am a HUGE fan of recording guitars/basses with mics rather than using the line out.
     
  10. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jul 23, 2021

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