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nifty input/output jacks...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by JSPguitars, Feb 13, 2005.


  1. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
  2. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    They are made by Neutrik. I have one in my Conklin bass.
     
  3. budman

    budman Commercial User

    Oct 7, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Formerly the owner/builder of LeCompte Electric Bass
    What's up with the grossly oversized pickup routings?
     
  4. LajoieT

    LajoieT I won't let your shadow be my shade...

    Oct 7, 2003
    Western Massachusetts
    well since the original question has been so well answered I'll continue the hijack.
    First look at that bass and I thought it was a GREAT looking piece (I still think it LOOKS great!!!) but a couple of questions came up after looking a bit closer (string angle after the nut, pet peeve, Pickup routes look like they may hit the control route but I don't mind the oversize of them and like the angle, wish the battery could be somewhere else, Locatin of the 2 lower string ferulles looks intentionally different, and I like adjustable bridges). But overall it looks like a well made bass with a nice combination of several styles, It looks to me like a colaboration between Alembic, Ritter,and for some reason I think Roscoe (But I'm not sure why). Anyone know anything about the builder?
     
  5. Personally I find that bass to be very enticing. But then again odd shapes and cool wood always peak my interest. :)
    I've never heard of Dillon, it does look cool to me. And boy LajoieT that sure is tough company to compare it to, an Alembic/Ritter/Roscoe combo, speaking of wood I now have it. LOL
    Dirk
     
  6. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    heh, I was hoping someone would comment on that bass. Indeed, the pickup cavities are quite oversized. I didn't even notice that on first glance......

    His 'perfect' bass is not mine.

    but it's definitely interesting to look at for a few moments.
     
  7. The way the term "uncompormising" is used, I would have expected certain things to be different...

    First, it is a certain compromise to use a bar style bridge on this bass. I know, I know, it's a fretless and precise string intonation isn't usually on top of the list of features but I would think that to be truly uncompromising, the builder wouldn't have left intonation to the player.

    I second Lajoie's bit about the battery box. C'mon - hours and hours of design and preperation and the builder couldn't plan to have the ring of the cavity NOT cross the glue joint of the neck and body wing? From a design standpoint, it's distracting and could have been easily avoided.

    My final peeve is the upper horn. I'm not a big horn guy and those of you that are have more experience than I. But I wouldn't trust that particular arrangement of shape and location of the joint to hold up under all possible situations. Call me the nervous type - I just wouldn't build it that way to have ALL of the weight resting on about 1½" square inches of stressed side grain that could split like a fence rail.

    I guess I'll never be a real bass builder... :scowl:
     
  8. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I think you're right, Hambone. (Edit: I would like to restate some things I said. It didn't come oput quite right.) I really don't like those parts of the design. I don't like the battery box placement, and I would rather have had it in the control cavity. Put some metal inserts with machine screws, and it would be easy to replace. Also, the upper horn looks like it may be unstable, but I could be wrong. Though I don't think you would thrash around on stage with such an instrument, I like more substance to that part of the bass. I also like an adjustable bridge on my basses, as I like to get as precise of a setup as I can.
     
  9. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    It looks pretty clear to me that the builder angled the battery box intentionally. Maybe it's distracting to you (and others) but I think it was probably done that way to reflect the angle of the pickups on the other side. Either that or he threw the cavity template over his shoulder onto the bass and just routed it where it landed. In any case, I think that style and taste are something you have to give a guy (yes, even Wish ;) ) and then take or leave his bass.
     
  10. OK Matt, I can see your point about the angle mirroring the pup angle on the other side. In fact, it's a pretty clever way to utilize the space available for the battery. But your second option of how he arrived at this precise placement just validates my observation. Yep, I'm gonna dissect it to the nth degree here - don't anyone read further if it makes you squeemish... :p
    The battery box is over the glue line the same amount on the one side as it is inside the line on the other side. That's NOT a blind decision. That's a compromise - the original reason for all of our critiques. From the pic, it appears the battery box was put there to avoid the contour coming out of the scoop on the top of the body. Looks to me like the battery box was an afterthought or the size wasn't accounted for in the initial planning OR something else happened that required it being put there in that way. My only question then would be, if the builder was talented enough to design and put together this beautiful instrument and then claim it shows no compormises, why wouldn't he not tackle making a nice battery box or at least the frame so that if fit nicely? :confused:

    Sure it's all subjective, it's all opinion, it's all in the eye of the beholder, it's one man's junk being another man's treasure. I get it, I always have, I've never forgotten it, and I won't forget it. I'm still wondering though, why that argument must always be introduced to a thread when a question of choice is stated. I think discussing why the builder may have done what he did is important to our own growth as builders. Wait, that's an opinion too! Damn, we can't get away from our opinions! They follow us everywhere. And that's the rub. Since we can't actually divorce ourselves from our opinions, can't we just assume that most of what we write IS an opinion and it's being offered as just another window opening out on the bigger picture and not as if the writer has a desire to impress their will on everyone else?
     
  11. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Thank god we don't all have the same opinion(s)!
    I kind of threw that bass pic link out there to hopefully hear some of your opinions, because I respect them. (and I really want some of those input jacks).
    I figure that's the only way to learn about the design/functions/etc. of building that I don't normally think about in the build process, since i don't know anyone first-hand that builds stuff. I dig reading your critiques, makes me think!
     
  12. And I think you have exactly the right attitude, especially if you aren't plugged into one of the sub-disciplines used in building like design, electronics, fine woodworking, or acoustical engineering.

    And it's precisely because I have a background in design that I'm so picky about these things. I've spent nearly my entire career looking for and trying to correct little visual flaws like this. I've designed packages, products, clothes, printed materials, signs, automotive parts, and any number of other things (I like to say "One of everything" :D ) and everytime I've had to make sure I didn't have some little detail out of place that drew the eye where it shouldn't. The same thing is done in fashion, interior decorating, automotive design, landscaping, architecture, and the fine arts. In fact, I would consider it one of the marks of a real artist craftsman. By that I mean, the builder going way beyond even the esoteric. And I think we all can cite examples of this. For me, it would be just about any Alembic bass made. I simply don't see any visual, or functional flaws in these instruments. There isn't a single detail that leaps out to my eye and demands an explanation as to why it's there. Sure, the shape or style may not suit all individuals taste but they are perfectly executed and do fulfill the desires of the buyer.

    And that's why I used to use the tagline "Wickersham Wannabe" under my screen name for so long. That degree of perfection or "uncompromising" quality is really a beautiful thing to me - something I won't ever likely attain but it's nice to look at from a distance. :meh:
     
  13. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    We will never escape the subjective versus objective debate because so much of what goes into a bass is subjective decisionmaking. I don't think any reasonable person would argue that you're wrong for not liking the placement of the battery comparment on the Dillon pictured above. All I'm saying is that the dude who built the bass probably does not consider that a compromise. In fact, he (or she?) probably considered the alternatives and decided that they would in fact have been a compromise of another sort (like running into a contour).

    I guess that I like to leave my own options open so that if I were in the position where I decided I had to put my battery cavity across a glue line (something which I have done) I could do it and people would not consider it a questionable decision or poor judgment. If it doesn't affect antyhing other than the aesthetics of an instrument, then I think it is what it is and you either love it or leave it.
     
  14. patrickj

    patrickj

    Aug 13, 2001
    Baltimore, MD
    Actually, if you look at the bass pretty closely, it's pretty obvious why the battery is located where it is. It may offend desire for symmetery, but quite honestly, pickup placement is far more important to a bass than style or design of the battery compartment, which doesn't effect function and isn't even visible most of the time (tho it is felt by the bassist).

    The compartment hangs over the glue joint to compensate for the carved edges. It also couldn't have been located any lower on the body (toward the bottom strap lock) because of the depth of the neck pickup route. That body isn't very deep, I'm guessing maybe 1.25". Pickup route, 9v battery compartment, there's just not enough room.

    It's obvious that the battery isn't installed in control cavity because the builder included a snap open compartment for quick change. Because of this, there's no other real location the compartment could have gone. It's current location (and angle) is lined up pretty much to make the least amount of contact to the actual body of the player. Moving the batt comp. to any other point would have either resulted in reduced structural stability (for instance, routing out a parallel check of wood hidden in the neck 'pocket' - bad). Moving the pocket to the free horn would have dug the edges of the compartment into the players hip.

    It may offend the sensibilities, but from a practical standpoint IMO, there's no better place for it.

    Style always seems to be sought over substance ;0

    That coulkd have all been avoided if the builder put the batt in the control cavity, but using the parts that he/she did, it's obvious that the battery is supposed to go where it currently is.
     
  15. elros

    elros

    Apr 24, 2004
    Norway
    Proprietor, Helland Musikk Teknologi
    To elaborate further on these jacks:

    They are made that way to fit into a system together with other Neutrik connectors: their XLRs, BNCs, Speakons, PowerCons, RCAs, RJ45s, and probably others I've forgotten; they're all the same shape (called the D shape IIRC) and will fit into a universal panel cutout.
    Like this:
    [​IMG]
    I've built several installations using this; it's quite neat.
    "Custom-made solutions, off the shelf" they call it, the Norwegian company that makes the panels.

    Not that you'd ever want to put a panel like that on a bass. :smug:
     
  16. LajoieT

    LajoieT I won't let your shadow be my shade...

    Oct 7, 2003
    Western Massachusetts
    That might be a bit big for your typical bass :D

    And don't even get me started on the discussion of the design compromises that would have to take place... :eek: ;)
     
  17. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    Right, let's get back on topic.

    The Neutrik jacks are the sturdiest in construction that I have used. They do not install as easily as other jacks due to their peculiar shape, however if you don't mind working that out I heartily recommend them. I believe I got mine from Performance Audio and they sent some candy with my order.

    I don't think they usually send candy with orders, but I really did get some.
     
  18. I just bought a newtrik jack to put in a bass I'm building ...they came without mounting screws. Also, that locking red tab feels really hard to push in to get the cable out. Does it get easier once it's mounted? I would like to find that out now before I drill the gigantic 15/16" hole needed to mount it.