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putting 6string bass strings on a guitar for a D G C F A D tuning

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by SeBass LoBoss, Oct 14, 2017.


  1. Alright folks, My quiestion is: to tune a guitar from low string to high in D,G,C,F,A,D tuning...
    Since the bass is tuned one octave below the guitar, I was thinking about putting the D G and high C electric bass guitar strings on an acoustic guitar and then following with an E guitar string tuned half step up to F following the A and D strings accordingly, and developing a roaring superultra sound on an fairly strong made guitar, calculating that THAt wouldnt damage a guitar too much, . I am just confused with the gauges of strings (bass high C and low E to F guitar string), does this make sense? in the way that the tension is fairly OK with the high end of this experiment. just tuning a half step up the E string and leaving all the other strings to their tension purpuse.
    the things that I am afraid is the length of the neck fact, the obvious tension fact, and also the fact that I may be deaf in the way that I dont really hear the difference of octaves in E´s between the bass and the guitar, know what I mean? I mean I obviously can tell the diference in sound and the fact that the bass is as bass as it gets , but I see it more as a diference in "timbre" (in spanish), I mean I hear the difference in depth and brightness, but not in frecuency. I hope I explained myself fully and that somebody can help me out.
    And if this is not on the correct thread, can you point me to where it belongs please?
    much bassist love
     
  2. Dabndug

    Dabndug Supporting Member

    Sep 27, 2017
    Somewhere in Oz
    In addition to having to perform a major filing operation on the nut (and possibly conducting surgery on the bridge) of your guitar to get the bass strings to sit, the substantial scale difference will result in the bass strings being very floppy indeed. You'd be way better off going up a few gauges in standard guitar string to get something playable that won't require radical mods to the guitar. They'll be way cheaper too.
     
    T_Bone_TL likes this.
  3. knumbskull

    knumbskull

    Jul 28, 2007
    UK
    Just get slightly heavier guage guitar strings. D really isn't that low. 48s or 52s are widely available.
     
    T_Bone_TL and gebass6 like this.
  4. ok, understood, I thought I had something here, thanks !
     
    knumbskull likes this.
  5. Slater

    Slater Leave that thing alone.

    Apr 17, 2000
    The Great Lakes State
    If i’m understanding correctly, you’re just down tuning one full step (E to D etc.). If that’s the case, just use your favorite standard guitar strings, just maybe a slightly heavier gauge.
     
    Conkal likes this.
  6. in fact, the idea was to lower it an OCTAVE and a full step: thats why I was thinking about bass strings, but as somone said earlier, it would get too flooppy, also, as I said Im not really sure if the octave in the guitar is really an octave higher than the bass. In theory it is, but in frequency ... im not sure
     
  7. any way just went with normal strings and thats just fine, heavier gauge and tension will be my definite choice for my next set of strings
    thanks everyone
     
  8. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth Inactive

    guitars are definitely an octave higher

    notechart_fretfreq-jpg.jpg
     
    SeBass LoBoss likes this.
  9. Arie X

    Arie X

    Oct 19, 2015
    i've been tuning to DGCFAD (D std) for like 30+ years with .009-.042's on 25.5 scale guitars, and .010-.046 on 24.75 scale guitars. No need for bass strings. If you have multiple guitars just mix up your string weights and scale lengths to have nearly the same tension on all of them.
     
    SeBass LoBoss likes this.
  10. Aidil

    Aidil

    Dec 4, 2014
    Jkt, IDN
    You have to use very thick strings to get that an OCTAVE and a full step lower goal on a guitar with standard 25.5" scale length.

    For comparison, on my 30" scale Ibanez SRC6 crossover bass guitar, a .095 string is only adequate low E since it still feels rather floppy compared to the same .095 string on 34" scale bass. Ibanez even put a .110 for low E on their AGB205A / AGBV205A 30.3" scale Artcore bass guitar.

    But if you owned the SRC6, a Bass VI or any other crossover bass guitar alike, which is tuned E-A-D-G-B-E like guitar but an OCTAVE lower, you just might still have a usable bass guitar when you tuned it even lower a full step to D-G-C-F-A-D with certain string set like the one I'm currently using (La Bella flat .095-.026. Even thicker strings are still preferred for this kind of goal).
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2017
    SeBass LoBoss likes this.
  11. LUpton

    LUpton Supporting Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    Tampa, FL
    Probably too old for this sh--
    I used a Brice SS (30") 6 string bass for a while a couple of yrs ago tuned D std in guitar intervals like the OP desires. This was for a 'tiki-bar' trio of old guys, so the lowered tuning helped vocals.

    I used the GHS short scale set that has a .107 E, and added a wound .030 and a plain .020 for 5th and 6 strings. It was hard to barre chord, but the occasional lead line on the upper strings sounded fine w some added overdrive.

    I liked this approach better than the Bass VI approach, as this sounded like a real bass when played on the lower strings. I never bonded w the Bass VI...

    I imagine the Ibanez crossover would do a good job, as well, since it's a 30" scale.
     
  12. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Apr 20, 2021

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