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Recording Mic

Discussion in 'Amps, Mics & Pickups [DB]' started by showfeet, Jul 30, 2012.


  1. showfeet

    showfeet

    Jan 6, 2012
    St. Louis, MO
    I am going to start recording a Jazz album in my basement with some friends. I have not recorded much (I am a high school student) but I think it would be better to go with a mic than with my Realist. What kind of mic should I use? I large diaphragm condenser? A ribbon? Any specific models? I would like this to be under $150, but budgets never hold true, so what ever. Thanks!
    -Show Feet
     
  2. RSBBass

    RSBBass

    Jun 11, 2011
    NYC
    There are others here with more experience and knowledge, so take what they say with more than this: For recording a DB a condenser mike has the ability to respond to the wide dynamic range. They do need phantom power so that can be an issue. I picked up a used Rhode NT 1A for $75 and it does a nice job for home recording.
     
  3. showfeet

    showfeet

    Jan 6, 2012
    St. Louis, MO
    Thank you for the information. I think I will go with a condenser based on what I've read.
     
  4. colcifer

    colcifer Esteemed Nitpicker Supporting Member

    Feb 10, 2010
    A Galaxy Far, Far Away
    If you have enough ins, record using the pickup too. It's always good to have options.
     
  5. If you only need the mic for this recording, I'd look into renting one. Some stores rent out gear, and they can help you choose a decent mic without hurting your budget too much.
     
  6. GrowlerBox

    GrowlerBox

    Feb 10, 2010
    Nude Zealand
    There are a good many relatively inexpensive large-diaphragm condensers that will do a more than adequate job. I like the Studio Projects B3 (similar to the B1 with some additional features like switchable pickup pattern). Rode also makes good mics. Someone mentioned the AT2020 here or on another similar thread - I find this a little noisy, but it'll still do the job. Microphones at this level very much comply with one of the various permutations of the 80/20 rule - you get 80% of the mic for 20% of the cost of the highest end mics, or thereabouts.

    Far more important in this context is making sure you give the recording space some treatment, and paying attention to instrument and mic placement - even the best mic will only record what you give it. Some evils can be addressed in mixing, but a decent raw recording is worth the weight of something far heavier than digital bits. There are countless on-line fora and handbooks that will give you a start. Brandon Drury's website has much to offer.

    Have fun!
     
  7. showfeet

    showfeet

    Jan 6, 2012
    St. Louis, MO
    Thank you guys for the recommendations, and I'll defiantly use my pickup as well.

    As for mic placement:
    From what I hear placement is key and is different to get the sound I want. But where is a good starting spot.

    I would also like a little bit of help in regards to room treatment, as I am inexperienced with that.
     
  8. GrowlerBox

    GrowlerBox

    Feb 10, 2010
    Nude Zealand
    No need to be defiant!

    Here's a simple article (http://www.recordingmag.com/resources/resourceDetail/204.html) on recording double bass. There's also plenty of stuff on this forum. Have a brief read about "bass traps", but don't get conned into spending money on expensive acoustic foam and such. Do some searches on "quick and dirty bass traps".
     

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