Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

settle an argument.

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by jim primate, Nov 22, 2004.


  1. jim primate

    jim primate bass guitarist.

    ok, i contend that the open E on a bass is 2 octaves lower than a low E on a guitar. back me up or shut me up.
     
  2. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    You're wrong. It's one octave. Now dance, boy! Dance!
     
  3. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    One! My guitarist always used to tune to my 12th fret E. I was the only one ever in tune, and they didn't like trying to hear the octave, so I just pick a 12th fret and play. :)


    Ray
     
  4. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    ask john mclaughlin would say, "wrong". one, good try.
     
  5. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    I don't have to post this, but I do it because I can:

    One.
     
  6. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    one octave lower, i have a bass and a guitar...
    ...well...actually, i sold my guitar recently, but i HAD a guitar for like 3 years.(while having a bass of course!)
     
  7. jim primate

    jim primate bass guitarist.

    thanks. i'm an idiot.
     
  8. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    Join the club.
     
  9. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA

    We know. ;) :D
     
  10. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    One octave lower.

    To confuse you further, both bass guitar and guitar are written one octave higher than they sound.