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stripped saddle screw

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Da Funk Docta, Jun 19, 2005.


  1. so i was adjusting my intonation on my saddles for new strings, and i managed to strip the intonation screws for my B and E strings.... so umm... considering i get them out... where do i get a new screw? i tryed a million harware stores, and noone has a screw that'll fit my gosh darn saddles.im open to anything really. thanks in advance, and thanks for helping in the past!
     
  2. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    Do you know what kind of screw it is? (measurements including length, diameter, thread pitch, etc.)

    There are stores that just deal in fasteners, you may need to go to one of them instead of just a hardware store.

    Or possibly a music store that has a repair shop? I bet that is a reasonably common item.

    I tried a bit of Googling with no luck Maybe someone else can find something more definite.

    Good luck!

    :D

    Joe.
     
  3. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    Contact the bass maker. They just might hook you up with such a low cost part.
     
  4. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    maybe try allparts or stew mac?

    they have a gizzillion parts.
     
  5. you stripped the B and E? maybe after screwing up one of them (no pun intended) you would have realised you have the wrong sized tool or are using too much force



    sorry, im in a tad of a crabbit mood today
     
  6. xshawnxearthx

    xshawnxearthx

    Aug 23, 2004
    new jersey
    my 2004 mia p came with 4 that were stripped.
     
  7. Groover

    Groover

    Jun 28, 2005
    Ohio, USA
    Try a hobby store where they sell remote controlled (R/C) cars and planes. Some of the little set screws used for gears, axles and such might fit the saddles.
     
  8. If the manufacturer doesn't get you set up, try carefully removing one of the screws that is still sound. Take it to any high end hardware store. They should have a test die that will allow you to identify the thread size of your screw. You also need to measure the length, so you should buy one of those 6" precision rules that cost about $2. Armed with this info (thread designation and length), go to the Allparts site (I don't have anything to do with them beyond being a customer.) and you can order some exact replacements, usually in the matching finish (stainless, black, etc.). I would suggest replacing all eight or ten of them because if four let go, the others probably got "shaved" at the same time, and they will fail sooner rather than later.
     
  9. or just take a screw thats fine into a "hardware" shop and ask for a few of the same?

    Id at least try that first
     
  10. That's a good idea. If you have a common size they might have them under "set screws" that are used on common electric devices. Where I live, most places wouldn't have anything close, and you would probably have to drive around a lot to find direct replacements locally. If the most convenient local vendors don't carry what I need, I have found it cheaper and faster to check out some of the better luthier parts and tool suppliers online on a regular basis. I learn about things I didn't know I needed, and I know where to go the next time I need some of the unusual tools and parts I might be looking for.
     
  11. LizzyD

    LizzyD Chocoholic

    Oct 15, 2002
    Seattle, WA
    Sadowsky Artist
    I have a MIA Fender Jazz V I bought used, and most of the saddle screws were already stripped. I did a little research and couldn't find anything solid about what size they were or whether it was possible to get replacements (I didn't try very hard).

    In the meantime I discovered that loosening the strings (totally slack) when I wanted to adjust the saddle height made them much easier to work with, since there's no tension on the saddles holding them down. Trying to adjust them with the strings at pitch may have contributed to stripping them in the first place.

    If that helps any.
     
  12. thanks alot for the replys :)