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Sunday afternoon is alright for baking.

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Michael B, Mar 6, 2016.


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  1. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    image. Baked Fender anyone?

    175 degrees for one hour.

    Too toxic for the home oven? Hmmm.
     
  2. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    image.
     
    walterw likes this.
  3. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    image. image. Holy cow. It worked 100%.

    All back together with a straight neck and some low arse action.
     
    walterw likes this.
  4. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Nicely done. I hope it stays that way for you!
     
  5. twinjet

    twinjet Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Sep 23, 2008
    49
    Neat, hope to hear about it soon!
     
  6. AEVAREX

    AEVAREX

    Jun 10, 2013
    Western Ma.
    Toxic? Who cares as long as you end up with a fresh baked jazz 5er! Is the tone any crisper? Sry had to ask.
    Let us know if it holds up after the full changeover to spring. I usually have to tweek twice a year around these neck of the woods.
     
  7. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    I was worried that it would revert after 24 hours. But it's all good. I checked the setup again today and it's good.
     
    JustForSport likes this.
  8. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    Still good but not full spring here yet. It actually snowed this week.
     
  9. AEVAREX

    AEVAREX

    Jun 10, 2013
    Western Ma.
    I had snow on my car again yesterday morning, just a dusting but none the less. Shouldn't be long before the last of the cold nights. Good to hear it's holding up so far.
     
  10. Wow! Was this to fix the Fender ski jump? I've got that going on and was thinking of just selling the body at this point. But if I can fix the neck then I'd love to keep it!

    If it doesn't work, no loss, I can still sell the body or buy a neck. Was there a specific force you used? How did you pick the locations to clamp? This is quickly going to become a "hold my beer" kind of day...
     
  11. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    No. The ski jump is a little different. You can have a maxed out truss rod and not have the jump. This neck just had too much relief and had run out of truss Rod adjustment.

    For the ski jump there is a flat part (or sloping up) at the neck heal, then a lot of relief.
     
  12. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    Only girls bake.
     
  13. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    You've got some nerve!
     
    Joe Nerve likes this.
  14. You think it's worth a try anyways? I've seen a few places that claimed heat treatment under pressure was a solid ($200+) remedy. The bass isn't really worth that money so I was gonna try a home remedy if I could.
     
  15. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    I would. Just have a thermometer in there to check your oven. Good inner oven tenp is 150F.

    Clamping to a solid straight edge is the hardest part. I made it backbow while clamped a very slight bit. Made sure it was straight in the clamps. Loosen the truss rod first.

    When you take it out of the oven it may still be ever so slightly back bowed or straight. Then string tension will put relief. The truss Rod should work well enough now to counter.

    If your action is still too high and your bridge saddles are on the bottom you need a small shim. Since you are fixing the neck angle and can try to get lower action, this is a common thing to need to do especially on Fenders.

    Once the relief and action are good you can address remaining skip jump issue. If the frets are large enough you could probably level them. Beats taking off the fret board and planing the neck. Then getting a new fretboard and starting from scratch. Do the nut, relief and action first before evaluating the jump. None of that usually costs any money if you do it yourself.
     
    eekamike likes this.
  16. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    I kept the headstock out of the oven a bit just in case.
     
  17. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    And I don't know which types of finishes (on neck) might not fair well.
     
  18. aaronious

    aaronious Supporting Member

    May 23, 2011
    Denver CO
    I baked that whole body. Looks pretty cool. Sounds amazing. I'm not saying the baking helped, but I'm not saying it didn't. IMG_20160424_115310844.
     
  19. Michael B

    Michael B

    Dec 16, 2015
    Lowell, MA
    One thing I believe I haven't yet mentioned: it did darken the neck ever so slightly. Hardly noticeable.
     
  20. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    just saw this from the other thread on TGP; i was wondering why you left all the metal on the headstock, i woulda taken all that off. so it actually managed to get up to the needed temp with the oven door open like that?

    i've seen mention of this trick once or twice now, as opposed to using heat lamps or those crazy-expensive heat blankets. pretty cool (so to speak)
     

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