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synesthetics

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Vorago, Apr 27, 2006.


  1. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    I'm thinking of making a bachelor scription on synesthetics, which is a part of psycholinguïstics. I haven't found a specific angle yet, but I'd like to hear some experiences from people who have this 'condition', more specificly regarding language, spelling, reading, specific difficulties towards language in general etc. This way I could generate a hypothesis and do an experiment.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Researching this via testimonials on the internet is a bad idea. Too many people hear about this condition and THINK they have it because it sounds neat and go around saying "dude, 6 is blue."
     
  3. BassChuck

    BassChuck Supporting Member

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati
    Chromasynestis (sp?) is the seeing of colors when you hear sounds. I think this is a closely related disorder to the one you are talking about. Some famous composers had this syndrome, notably Rimsky-Korsakov and Scriaben.

    There has been some research done into this. It might make an interesting sidebar to you paper, or maybe amplify some of your points.
     
  4. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Nono, I'm not planning by rerearching this via the internet, but I'm was hoping to hear some people with this condition who can tell me if they have specific spelling/.language/comprehension problems in general. If I know of these problems, I could look for Dutch speakers with this condition and work from there.
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    Olivier Messaien (see my sig) is famous for this and based many of his compositions on this - like "Chronochromie" :)
     
  6. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    I wouldn't do it, man. That L. Ron Hubbard dude is overrated.

    bc
     
  7. that would be a cool disorder to have :)
     
  8. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck

    Apr 21, 2000
    Atlanta (Grant Park!)
    Gallien Krueger for the last 12 years!
    So, it's like being on LSD? Btw, I'm being serious. Back in my stupid youth days, I saw sounds and heard colors whenever I....you know......
     
  9. jkritchey

    jkritchey

    Jul 23, 2002
    Northern Va.
    I thought that another aspect of this was the way some people perceive calendars and the movement of time in general.

    Example: What is the shape and direction of movement of a week's time? Does it start on the left or right? What shape, in your mind's eye, is a Year long Calendar?
     
  10. Brad Barker

    Brad Barker

    Apr 13, 2001
    berkeley, ca
    lol, good guess. six IS blue to me. :cool:


    i'm a synesthete (or however it's spelled), but i don't have any real problems with language. so i don't think i'm useful for this.
     
  11. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Damnit, no spelling issues, certain mistakes you make a lot, etc?
     
  12. Brad Barker

    Brad Barker

    Apr 13, 2001
    berkeley, ca
    oh, there is one:

    whenever i can't recall exactly what a word is, i'll say, "it starts with a [whatever]."

    and i'll be TOTALLY off! :D


    i'm not sure how many times the incorrect letter "shares" the same color as the correct letter, so i can't say that this is because of my synesthesia, per se.


    i actually use my color-assignment to help me study for things. i'll remember things as "the yellow equation" or "the red equation" or something.
     
  13. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Riff-finder General Supporting Member

    Sep 28, 2005
    Springfield, MA
    If I could do that, school would be so much easier.

    There was an article about synesthesia in a test I took earlier this month. This was probably the only thing I've ever read in a standardized test booklet that stayed in my head.

    There's a book about a detective with that condition, who can use it to see the emotions of the people he is talking to. He can see when they're lying, too. There is also an artist in New York with synesthesia who uses what she sees and feels as a result of the condition as inspiration for her artwork.
     
  14. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium

    Interesting! Thanks for sharing this.

    Could you elaborate a bit? I could be on to something here.
     
  15. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Meh. I do that all the time too.

    And 6 is just 6 to me.

    bc
     
  16. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Say Brad; when you suffer from TOT phenomenon (Tip of the tongue; you know you know a word, but you can't find), are you able to "know" the colour of that word, or do you "know" how it sounds, or both?
     
  17. 6

    Man, it would be cool to see colors when you hear things. I can't imagine what a symphony would be like if you saw colors along with it.

    Rock on
    Eric
     
  18. Brad Barker

    Brad Barker

    Apr 13, 2001
    berkeley, ca
    i don't recall...

    don't think so, though. :meh:
     
  19. Scott D

    Scott D

    Apr 21, 2003
    Minneapolis, MN
    Something that might be more common are people who have their corpus collosum (the tissue that connects the two halves of the brain together) severed.

    It's really interesting. Most of language is stored in the left hemisphere. With people who have their corpus collosum (no lateral activity), they can read words in their right visual fields (gets sent to the left side of the brain, which processes it), but if you show they same word in their left field (sending to the right side), they can't tell you what the word is.

    The kicker is, they can write the word. They just won't know what it is if it is in their left visual field.

    Also, google "Broca's Area", and "Wernicke's Aphasia", both are very interesting linguistic conditions.

    When someone has damage to Broca's area, they have great comprehension of language, but their grammar just doesn't work right. An example...

    Doctor: What was your previous occupation?
    Patient: cars... worked... on...
    Doctor: Were you a mechanic?
    Patient: Yes.

    When someone has Wernicke's Aphasia, it is the exact opposite. Their grammar and everything are good, but they have no comprehension of the meaning. They often make up words. Another example...

    Doctor: What was your previous occupation?
    Patient: Well, once I climbed a hassel and walked in urt.
    Doctor: I'm sorry? What was that?
    Patient: Sorry, I just don't yutumble.

    They are really interesting conditions. I'm taking Linguistics in college right now and I am loving it. Good luck with your project.


    EDIT: I think i might have misread your original post... I thought you were looking for different lingustic conditions. Maybe you are... i dunno.
     
  20. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck

    Apr 21, 2000
    Atlanta (Grant Park!)
    Gallien Krueger for the last 12 years!
    Remembering my many LSD trips, it ain't as cool as it seems. :scowl:
     

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