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Tapping your foot while playing - Please Stop?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by darwin-bass, Sep 19, 2020.


  1. darwin-bass

    darwin-bass Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2013
    Salem OR
    Do you tap your foot to keep time? I sure do. And in recent videos of me I see just how distracting it is. It has caused me to stop wearing white shoes on stage. Beyond that I think I need to stop tapping my foot and maybe start bouncing my leg or swaying or something more dance-like to keep time. I'm not sure I see many pro entertainers tapping their foot.

    Do you tap your foot? Or have you stopped? If so, how?
     
    Williethump, teh-slb and FRoss6788 like this.
  2. In the interests of satisfying those folks who say I stand statute-like, I try tap my foot and sway back and forth as much as possible. I am not sure I am doing it to keep my time, but rather to encourage other people to move their bodies.
     
    Jamie Amos, mikewalker, tpa and 4 others like this.
  3. Oddly

    Oddly

    Jan 17, 2014
    Dublin, Ireland.
    Distracting for who?
    I get that wearing white shoes might make it more obvious, and you've clearly seen the light there and stopped wearing such crimes against humanity and fashion, but seriously I doubt anyone's watching the bassplayer's feet.
    I've always done it...indeed I've told a couple of time-challenged guitarists that if they lose timing to use my foot as a metronome to get themselves back in line.
     
  4. Why not? It's a time-honored tradition taught to many of us as a way to keep time and get the feel into our bodies.

    I will confess that when I sit and play I sometimes STOMP my foot, which is definitely distracting. But just tapping? Nah. Been done by many.
     
  5. Lagado

    Lagado Suspended

    Jan 6, 2020
    Well, you know what to do, integrate it into your thing. Get on your good foot and dance:

     
  6. Lagado

    Lagado Suspended

    Jan 6, 2020
    Sway, every one lands on the onbeat. Tapping your foot, includes the offbeat. No need.
    What you sway depends on how you're feeling.
     
    Williethump likes this.
  7. Winslow

    Winslow

    Sep 25, 2011
    Group "W" Bench
    Foot-tapping was a peeve of an old choir director I knew. He suggested tapping one's toe inside your shoe. Turns out that works quite well! You still get to feel yourself keeping time somewhere, but no one can see it going on. :thumbsup:
     
  8. bradd

    bradd Supporting Member

    Jan 27, 2008
    Minneapolis, MN
    I'd be more distracted by white shoes on stage than what you're doing with the foot:jawdrop:
     
  9. Michedelic

    Michedelic MId-Century Modern

    I dunno, it’s either that, gum chewing, or crotch thrusting for me.
     
  10. thabassmon

    thabassmon

    Sep 26, 2013
    New Zealand
    I don't tap my foot while playing at all, but if it helps you play why not?

    My dad (guitar player) not just taps his foot, he stomps with his heel so hard it harder to hear the guitar over it when he plays acoustically, that just gets annoying, so as long as you don't get to that extreme it's fine.
     
    L Anthony and gebass6 like this.
  11. Stratomato

    Stratomato

    Jun 26, 2019
    San Diego
    Off subject, but this reminds me of a busker I saw "tapping" his foot on a bass drum pedal while playing guitar. His bass drum was an old suitcase. It looked and sounded pretty cool.
     
    LowActionHero, murphy and Timmy Liam like this.
  12. Lesfunk

    Lesfunk Supporting Member

    I was actually taught to tap my foot to help subdivide the beat (Downbeats and upbeats) while reading. It’s very effective.
    Jeff Berlin rocks back and forth like he’s autistic. Seems to work for him.
     
  13. jerry

    jerry Too old for a hiptrip Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 13, 1999
    My heel goes up and down, kinda a reverse tap I guess. I never thought about it, it's involuntary and after 50 years nobody's complained. :)
     
  14. micguy

    micguy

    May 17, 2011
    I don't know if anyone has told you, but symphonic conducting probably isn't in your future.
     
  15. JRA

    JRA my words = opinion Supporting Member

    :laugh: that's one of those 'flaunt-it-if-you've-got-it' moves....at least it was in my neighborhood...


    per the OP: sometimes i do. sometimes i don't. i can stop it by sheer force of will. :D
     
    Old Blastard, DrMole and Blueinred like this.
  16. darwin-bass

    darwin-bass Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2013
    Salem OR
    When I tap my foot I stand on my heels and become very motionless. Instead if I tap my heel (which is more like gently moving the lower leg) then I'm more on my toes and my whole body is free to move.

    I tried it this morning as I was practicing for tonight's rehearsal and found it easy to not tap my toe - if I thought about it.
     
  17. darwin-bass

    darwin-bass Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2013
    Salem OR
    When my kids were in HS I had a minor hobby of watching the feet of the kids in the concert band. So many of them tapped their feet to the rhythm but usually could not keep a steady beat. They would either stray off the beat or they'd tap their feet in time with the notes they were playing which did nothing to help them stay in time.
     
    Troy Eggen likes this.
  18. lokikallas

    lokikallas Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2010
    los angeles
    I don't tap my foot. I bang/bob my head or dance in place.
     
  19. Obese Chess

    Obese Chess Spicy Big Dad Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2005
    Portland, OR
    No because I'm too busy running around, jumping off things, etc.
     
  20. Wfrance3

    Wfrance3 Supporting Member

    May 29, 2014
    Tulsa, OK


    If you don’t have time to watch it all, skip ahead to a little past 5:30

    fwiw, this is what I think too, Adam and Julia are more entertaining.
     

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