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Volume discrepancy between clean and dirty tracks.

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by rydin4lifebass, Mar 13, 2019.


  1. Hi again fellas. I have a quick qustion about recording levels. I record into a Tascam DP-008. I run a clean signal from a Zoom B3 via XLR cable and a dirty signal from a Fender Rumble 350, also via XLR. My signal chain is Bass > Zoom B3> Fender Rumble in this case. What's odd is that the pre-effects out from the Zoom B3 is much louder than the signal coming from my amp. I guess I would have expected the signal from the amp to be much louder, but it's actually much lower and when I turn up the volume I tend to clip on the Tascam unit. Is there anything that I can do to help the volume out of the amp or adjust the Tascam to better pick up the volume and avoid clipping? I can hear the bass along with the track I'm playing with largely due to the volume of the clean signal, but I'd like to hear the dirty track a little better and record a solid version of it.

    For what it's worth, I pull the tracks into Audacity and Normalize along with the track I'm recording with. The tracks are OK when mixing, this was more of curiosity and volume question.Hi again fellas. I have a quick qustion about recording levels. I record into a Tascam DP-008. I run a clean signal from a Zoom B3 via XLR cable and a dirty signal from a Fender Rumble 350, also via XLR. My signal chain is Bass > Zoom B3> Fender Rumble in this case. What's odd is that the pre-effects out from the Zoom B3 is much louder than the signal coming from my amp. I guess I would have expected the signal from the amp to be much louder, but it's actually much lower and when I turn up the volume I tend to clip on the Tascam unit. Is there anything that I can do to help the volume out of the amp or adjust the Tascam to better pick up the volume and avoid clipping? I can hear the bass along with the track I'm playing with largely due to the volume of the cleaen signal, but I'd like to hear the dirty track a little better and record a solid version of it.

    For what it's worth, I pull the tracks into Audacity and Normalize along with the track I'm recording with. The tracks are OK when mixing, this was more of curiosity and volume question.
     
  2. Also, is the new Tascam unit DP-03SD a good upgrade from the DP-008 that I have, or not really worth buying?
     
  3. cornfarmer

    cornfarmer jam econo

    May 14, 2002
    I don't know much about those Tascam things, but you should have a way to turn up the input gain/trim on the channel coming from the amp, no? Turning up the volume on the amp is just making the amp louder - you need to turn up the input signal of the Tascam input channel.

    Alternatively, you could try the Rumble headphone jack or FX send --> Tascam
     
  4. I can adjust the input on the tascam, but get issues with clipping sometimes..possibly jjust some final tweaks.

    I'm not sure about the FX send from the amp into the Tascam, but I'll take a look at that.

    Also, to confirm, I am using mic/line input levels for everything.
     
  5. cornfarmer

    cornfarmer jam econo

    May 14, 2002
    Personally I'd ditch the Tascam stuff and get an interface to record straight to the computer. Seeing how you're transferring stuff to Audacity anyway.
     
  6. I thought about that, but decided not to for one reason or another. I could record direct and then copy the track so I'd still have a clean and dirty one to use...but I'm not sure about getting the amp and effect simulators. That seems like quite a hassle and I really don't understand the process to be honest.
     
  7. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    If turning up the input gain on a channel of the Tascam results in clipping that indicates that the signal peaks are exceeding 0dbfs. That's as loud as it can get. The only way to increase perceived loudness relative to the same peak level (i.e. dbRMS vs dbfs) is to reduce dynamics, which is commonly done by implementing compression, be it peak limiting or more "normal" compression.
     
  8. DigitalMan

    DigitalMan Wikipedia often mistakes my opinions for fact Supporting Member

    Nov 30, 2011
    The line out on the Rumble is affected by the volume on the Rumble. IMO that’s not a good recipe when tracking. I’d find another way to get a dirty signal like a pedal, Sansamp, amp modeling, etc.
     
  9. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    If you’re transferring the files to a computer anyway, why not just record one clean track, duplicate it, then apply the desired effect to the track’s copy within the DAW? You’re going through an awful lot of trouble otherwise. Unless I’m missing something?
     

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