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Why are some notes dropped from wall chart fretboard posters?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Greywoulf, Aug 8, 2019.


  1. OK, been looking at wall chart fretboard posters. Some show all four notes available at each fret position, while others only show sometimes only one, two or three notes. Why? Are the missing notes ones that are considered never (or almost never?) played on a bass guitar? Since I'm relearning again on a fretless I'd like to get this cleared up in my fairly dense mind.... ;>})
    Thanks,
    Greywoulf
     
  2. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    All of the notes should be there, they're all "fair game" (depending on what key you're in).
     
  3. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    Why not get yourself a sharpie and fill in the blanks for yourself? See it as a learning opportunity. To make it more fun, and complete, try adding the enharmonic equivalents that are almost always missing, such as Cb, E#, etc.
     
    Leo Smith likes this.
  4. RustyAxe

    RustyAxe

    Jul 8, 2008
    Connecticut
    Just a guess ... your chart is not a full fret map. Likely trying to illustrate a concept or pattern. Post a pic
     
    Mushroo likes this.
  5. mambo4

    mambo4

    Jun 9, 2006
    Dallas
    The charts with 'missing' notes are charts for:
    • the 'natural' notes (no sharps/flats, effectively C major)
    • or scales
    • or arpeggios
    • or intervals
    The 'missing' notes are in no way less likely to be played
     
  6. Malcolm35

    Malcolm35

    Aug 7, 2018
    If you are just now reading this post.
    Lot of reasons here. Not every song will use a note for each beat.

    No that is not why they are missing. A string of notes that goes on and on is not really music, it's just a bunch of notes. Music is usually in phrases, the melody takes a break to breath, etc. With out the standard notation fly specks we kinda have to guess at the rhythm - the rhythm of the note flow.

    That's why the time signature, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, etc. is important to know. Fake chord sheet music probably will not show the time signature. So you need to know the tune and sing it to get the rhythm when using dirt simple fake chord sheet music.

    All kinds of reasons is the answer to your question. Google has always been a friend, ask Google.

    Show us the sheet music you have and we can zero in a little better.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  7. mambo4

    mambo4

    Jun 9, 2006
    Dallas
    Pretty sure the OP is talking about this kind of thing
    [​IMG]

    Not an actual song chart
     
    Lobster11 likes this.
  8. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    Ah, that's what I though - no sharps / flats. The assumption must be you can figure that out for yourself - i.e., the note between a C and a D must therefore be a C#/Db.
     
  9. bass-chart. bass-chart. This is what I meant. I guess no sharps or flats pretty much explains it tho...
    Thanks,
    Greywoulf
     
  10. So that chart is showing you the notes in C Major / A (natural) minor.
     
    Groove Master likes this.
  11. Malcolm35

    Malcolm35

    Aug 7, 2018
    Yes and no. It is showing you the notes on the neck of the bass guitar. If you take the major scale box pattern and put the root note of the pattern on the C note you get C major notes with the box.

    If using that major scale box pattern and put the D root noet on the R of the pattern the notes of the D major scale await you within the box.

    Go to post # 14 in this string How to get started? it goes into detail.

    Happy trails.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  12. LBS-bass

    LBS-bass Supporting Member

    Nov 22, 2017
    California
    Those notes can be interpreted as sharps or flats, depending on what scale you're playing, so they are intentionally left up to interpretation.
     
  13. LetItGrowTone

    LetItGrowTone

    Apr 2, 2019
    That is a "scale".
    It's a collection of notes that go together.
    There are many other scales.
     
  14. LetItGrowTone

    LetItGrowTone

    Apr 2, 2019
    You can Google the other scales.
    If you play through them you'll notice that each has a "flavor".
    When I did this with 6 string guitar I noticed how much I loved the pentatonic minor scale, but I loved it so much I never learned anything else. Don't let that happen.
     
  15. Lobster11

    Lobster11 Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    Williamsburg, VA
    No, @g-dude was correct: These are all the notes in the C major (or A natural minor) scale -- i.e., all the notes with no sharps or flats. The "box pattern" you refer to is just one of many possible fingerings for the scale. If you're locked into that box pattern, you might find it a useful exercise to use the fretboard chart to work out other possible fingerings.
     
    LBS-bass likes this.
  16. Malcolm35

    Malcolm35

    Aug 7, 2018
    Lobster once again right on. No sharps or flats is the C major or A natural minor scale. My bad...
     
    Lobster11 likes this.
  17. I think you misunderstood me.

    The examples posted, and any example that only uses the natural tones, are in C-Major / A-Minor.
     
  18. Malcolm35

    Malcolm35

    Aug 7, 2018
    Yes I missed that. See post # 16.
     

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