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1975 Fender Jazz - vintage value damaged by refret?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Mike McGibney, Jul 20, 2005.


  1. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    Hi everyone - hope this is the right forum for this. I guess it might be setup or something - but hey - I'm sure I'll get a few answers within a short peroid.

    Bass no1 currently is an all original 75 jazz bass. I am thinking it's in need of a refret, there's quite a bit of wear there. Now, yes, it's a players bass, but I'm also considering vintage value, it's important also.

    Will a refret have a bearing on resale/vintage value?


    Many thanks!


    Mike



    PS What if I kept the frets that were removed.... :meh:
     
  2. TheEmptyCell

    TheEmptyCell Bearded Dingwall Enthusiast

    Jul 16, 2005
    Syracuse, NY
    Have it defretted and polyurethaned Jaco style!

    Sorry, but I can't actually help, I don't know much about resale on vintage stuff.
     
  3. Jaco did not use polyurethane. He used marine-grade epoxy.
     
  4. TheEmptyCell

    TheEmptyCell Bearded Dingwall Enthusiast

    Jul 16, 2005
    Syracuse, NY
    Apologies. I know he used marine epoxy, but I just said polyurethane, cuz that's the way I did my fretless.
     
  5. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    Okay, let's not get sidetracked. Any thoughs, anyone ?
     
  6. throbgod13

    throbgod13

    Mar 26, 2005
    Texas
    no, it's not going to affect your resale.. unless it's the most anal retentive collector..

    get it done by a very competent tech..
     
  7. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    Yeah - I'm planning the bass gallery, london. Cheers for your input. Look forward to hearing more.
     
  8. Mods are one thing: pup changes, refins, electronics changes, hardware changes, drilling etc...

    But when it comes refret, my only thought would be to use the same type of wire.


    Besides, if you are truly paranoid, here's a suggestion:

    Put the original neck in storage, get a good quality replacement ('75 RI necks can easily be found) and put that on instead.
     
  9. +1
    then you don't have to worry about it!
     
  10. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    a GOOD refret is never a bad thing. Are the current frets so far gone that they can't be recrowned?

    Once again, have it done. An unplayable vintage bass is good for the closet or for parting out...anyone who wants a 75 (vintage, yes...but not terribly collectable yet) wants it playable.

    Take it to someone who's good. Have them use the proper guage fretwire and take care not to chip the fretboard...most good vintage gear has this kind of stuff done.
     
  11. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    The real question is maple or rosewood? If it's a maple board you're going to have to deal with laquer, perhaps even a partial refin. If it's rosewood, it's unfinished so it should be fairly doable.

    I'd rather buy a bass with brand new frets for the same price if I'm gonna play it, but if it's a collector (who shouldn't be lookin' at your bass anyway) he'd want it original. You say it's a player's bass, make it playable.
     
  12. DavePlaysBass

    DavePlaysBass

    Mar 31, 2004
    CO
    If you are a collector, I would look for a new neck and save the old one. If you are a player that has an intimate connection with that neck, get a refret. I have a 61 Jazz bass that needs a refret. I have flats on it for the time being (and no money for a refret). If I ever decide to go back to rounds on it, I will refret it without hesitation because that neck has a feel that others do not.

    Dave
     
  13. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    Thanks for all your help, everyone. It's much appreciated.

    In answer to some questions; it's a maple neck. And I am most keen about having it a players bass, I guess.


    Here's a pic, for reference:


    [​IMG]



    Thanks everyone.


    Mike
     
  14. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    YOWSAH!! I want that bass.

    -Mike
     
  15. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Considering you got a Schaller bridge on there, I don't think a refret is too bad! Can't tell, how much is left? Recrowning them might do the trick
     
  16. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    The original bridge has been reinstalled. When I got the bass, it had the Schaller on it, plus a mirror PG (yuck). It is now 100% original.
     
  17. abngourmet

    abngourmet Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2004
    USA
    Mike,

    I have several "vintage" pieces in my stable. My prize vintage piece is my '73 Jazz. If I could only have one bass, this would be it. And I own $5K Alembics, too.

    My Jazz had to be refretted about two years ago. She was buzzing all over the place. I use roundwounds, so it's a casualty of that. I could have kept her stock, but she would have been unplayable. Unless I planned to put her in a case and never play her again, I had no choice but to refret. And I did, with a professional luthier (www.jwarwickguitars.com). And you know what? I don't regret it. Unless you plan on buying an instrument as an investment ('59 Les Paul, '54 Strat, '53 Precision, '60 Jazz, '76 Bicentennial Thunderbird, BOO serial Number Musicman, any Alembic ... well, OK, maybe not an investment given the current market, but I'm biased!), there is no reason you should not have it fixed/modded to your specifications. For me, I play my instruments. On my Jazz, the bridge (an original bridge, and a piece of crap IMHO) was replaced by a Badass II. The original pickups (one of which needed a total rewind) were replaced by Seymour Duncan stacks. The tuners were replaced because the originals were loose (I purchased direct replacement Schallers and retained the originals). All of these things made my bass more playable for me, and more enjoyable. And I play it almost every day. If you have to do the same to make your instrument better for you, I say go for it.

    If you want museum pieces, buy them. And don't play them. If you want an instrument that will bring you countless hours of joy, buy what you want, get it set up the way you want it, and share the goods with others when you can or when you choose to. My guess is the latter is more rewarding than the former in the long run.

    Alan
     
  18. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    Isn't this just the kind of thing that Lull does well? You'd probably pay more, but you'd get it done right and it would play better than it does now.
     
  19. abngourmet

    abngourmet Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2004
    USA
    Mike,

    She's a beaut. Get her refretted and keep playing her.

    Alan
     
  20. abngourmet

    abngourmet Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2004
    USA
    Here's my '73, warts and all ..