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Anyone else immediately disregard basses with a wide string spacing?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by stuffedbread, Jul 30, 2020.


  1. Rip Van Dan

    Rip Van Dan DNA Endorsing Artist Supporting Member

    Feb 2, 2009
    Duvall, WA
    Seems like all the ones I picked up over the years had that Deep U profile. I remember in 1966 when the new Fender Jazz came out with its bar markers and white binding on the neck, what a pretty bass it was. Then when they pulled it off the wall for me it had that deep U shape. Was still narrow but fat (deep). I hated that and couldn't figure out why they did it. I'll never like a neck like that.

    But you know, you're going to make me start looking at P-basses if there are a lot that have a slim neck. I know there are letters to designate the various necks they used (A, B, and C I think). Do you happen to know what letter designates the 1.58" nut width and the slim profile?
     
  2. The letter designates the ‘profile’ of the neck, c,v,u etc. The width is different. Traditional
    P-basses are 1.75 at the nut. J- basses are 1.50. There are some P-basses that are
    1 and 5/8 at the nut. Those are the narrower spaced necks. Now, the ‘profile’ is the ‘shape’
    of the neck ‘in profile’. There are even variations in the profile, the Squiers use the ‘C’
    profile, the slim ‘C’. You can get on Fender’s website and they list all of their necks.
    Hope I could be helpful!
     
  3. Dingwall 6ers are 18mm spacing.
     
  4. Samus C

    Samus C ACTIVE NEET Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2013
    Seattle, WA
    Yeah, I guess I was generalizing a lot of the mass produced bass makers. Its pretty common to find 18-19mm when you get above 1500$. Dingwall, like you said, Yamaha's TRBJP/TRB6P, The Atelier Z Stuff, Warwick Broadnecks, Roscoe, FBass, etc, etc.

    For the more mass produced, there's the MTD Kingston, and... I cant think of a lot else?
     
  5. I'm a big fan of the Yamaha's. Every single one I've every played seems to fit perfectly and play very smoothly and easily. Funny how I can't quite explain why I've never owned one. Especially since one of my favorite bass players of all time is Billy Sheehan. (scratching my head thinking "I should guy a Yamaha bass")
     
  6. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    I don’t care too much about string spacing on a 4 string. But on a 6 string I am fairy picky and I hate wide spaced six strings. I love the narrow spacing of my 14mm one. I also slap a lot but that’s no problem. I will never go back to wider spacing 6 string because the smaller string spacing has more advantages to me and makes me play things that are much harder on a wide spaced one.

    More makers should make 14mm spaced six string basses. We have very little choice now. I think the demand for smaller spaced six string is gettings bigger now.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
    ajkula66 likes this.
  7. 14 mm! :wideyed:
     
  8. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    Just try it. It is fun! :bassist::bassist::bassist:
     
    mickebas likes this.
  9. My fingers feels too tubby for 19mm sometimes, but maybe I should :bassist:
     
    Les Fret likes this.
  10. Said...no one...EVER!! :roflmao::wacky:
     
    Les Fret likes this.
  11. Rip Van Dan

    Rip Van Dan DNA Endorsing Artist Supporting Member

    Feb 2, 2009
    Duvall, WA
    Yes that helps a bit. The letter I'm looking for though is different than the C-shape, D-shape, U-shape. They actually called them A neck, B neck, C neck, (or something like that) and each one had a specific neck profile including the depth of the neck, shape, and a neck-width at the nut. I was hoping to find out about the one with the narrower width at the nut and slimmer profile is/was.
     
  12. The ‘A’ neck you’re thinking of is the A line neck, not a neck profile. My old MB4 has the A line.
    Width at nut is 1.5, just like a Jazz. But not ‘profiled’ like a Jazz.
     

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