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DIY Latching Footswitch?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by rodgersk24, Sep 10, 2009.


  1. Hello,

    I was wondering if anyone knows how to build one of these? I don't need the "A" jack and "B" jack, but just the "A/B" jack. I'd like to do a total of four switches, two "A/B" jacks, with each switch having its own LED, and everything being run off of the same power source, if possible (it'd be great to have battery and external power jack options).

    Basically, if that description was confusing (apologies if it was), two FS6 switches put in one housing running off the same power source minus the seperate "A" and "B" jacks, only the "A/B" jacks. I'd like to do this to 1. Just have one box and two cables and one battery and/or chord to the power supply, 2. Not spend $86 bucks, and MOST importantly, 3. An excuse to crack out the soldering iron and have fun making it!

    Any help would be nice, the best would be a picture or drawing (a ciruit drawing would help, but I can't read one of those quite yet, so an actual "wire to ring lug, wire to tip lug", etc would be the best!), else any sites to go to. I've checked a bunch of DIY stomp box sites--which in the process made me pretty G.A.S.-sy...--but couldn't find anything.

    And as always, I did multiple searches, and didn't find anything. But apologies if I did miss something, apologies.

    Thanks in advance!

    Kyle
     
  2. Anyone? Even how to do just one of these would be excellent, I could figure out how to wire up two of them on my own. Any help at all, even pointing towards a site would greatly be appreciated!

    Thanks!

    Kyle
     
  3. rpatter

    rpatter Supporting Member

    Sep 18, 2004
    Round Rock, TX
  4. Apologies. It's just a footswitch to control the features of the amp, so it's the same this as these (http://www.ashdownmusic.com/shop/Catalogue.asp?Show=FOOTSWITCH&ShowDesc=Footswitches#), except I don't want to spend about $65 on two separate ones, I just want to build my own into one box. From what I understand, the ring of the TRS plug is controlled by one switch, and the sleeve of the TRS plug is controlled by the other switch.

    I think the A/B selector is for selecting between different amps or basses. Or maybe I'm wrong...
     
  5. rpatter

    rpatter Supporting Member

    Sep 18, 2004
    Round Rock, TX
    You're right about the use of an A/B switch. I know I've seen circuits for what you're looking for, but can't remember where. I'll keep looking....

    Ralf
     
  6. That'd be great, I would really appreciate it! I found a bunch of stuff on a different forum about this exact question, except they were unanswered... I'm beginning to wonder if I need to just bite the bullet and buy some instead of build it... But that's a lot of cash for a couple of switches (albeit, really nice switches!)

    Otherwise, if nothing pops up I'll just crack open a cheap single switch and try to wire my own through trial and error. I have the single version of the Boss switch, and I know that's uses a PCB that I could never build, but maybe a cheap one will yield different results.

    But if you could find anything, that's be awesome! Thanks so much for the help!

    Kyle
     
  7. rpatter

    rpatter Supporting Member

    Sep 18, 2004
    Round Rock, TX
  8. Apologies for bringing this thread back up, but I think I've made a bit of progress...

    After finding a break from homework and doing some research, I think I may have come up with a diagram...

    Just a reminder, I'm looking for a footswitch box with LEDs to switch items on my amp (Ashdown ABM 500RC EVO II). The jack is a stereo jack, with sleeve being ground, and tip and ring running each item ("item" meaning "Sub/Valve" on the Ashdown).

    Does anyone know if the attached diagram will work? Apologies for the crudeness, I just did it in Paint... will the LEDs need power to work? How would I find out?

    Thanks!

    Best wishes,

    Kyle
     

    Attached Files:

  9. LEDs do need power, yes. Your diagram won't work, sorry to say.

    What you need is 2x double pole switches.

    One switch for the tip and one for the ring.

    On each switch, one pole shorts/opens the tip or ring to the sleeve, the other pole turns on/off the power to each LED.

    This is a very common DIY project, if you can't find anything then I would suggest trying different search terms.

    The diagrams in the thread linked by rpatter are correct, you just need to wire up the second pole of each switch between the LED's and a power sorce. Don't forget current limiting resistors for each LED.
     
  10. As it was my first diagram, I'm not surprised it didn't work :)

    Thanks for the response, much appreciated! Does this look better? Or do I need to move into a DPDT switch? I notice, niftydog, that you mentioned two "poles" which to me would mean that I need to move from a SP switch to a DP switch, but then you said that the linked diagram would work, which looks like SPDT switches to me. So, I just added (or tried to add) the LED to the linked diagram.

    And apologies, I should have mentioned before, I'm completely new to this stuff... I've soldered before, but never tried to figure things out like this... so pardon the (if they're present) stupid, obvious mistakes :)

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  11. jimmy rocket

    jimmy rocket

    Jan 24, 2008
    Ayden, NC
    Actually, for this application you generally don't "need" a separate power source for the LEDs. You wire the LED's into the circuit and since what you're doing with the footswitch is essentially opening or closing a circuit in the amp they'll light up when switched. You don't even need those resistors.


    I've done this with both Aguilar and GK amps. I don't have the capacity to diagram this out right now, but it's basically like your first diagram, but wiring the LED directly between the switch and the tip and sleeve. (2 switches, 2 LEDs)

    Also, you'll need to use a cord with a tip, ring and sleeve for this to work.
     
  12. jimmy rocket

    jimmy rocket

    Jan 24, 2008
    Ayden, NC
    ok, something like this but you may need to switch which poles of the switches you use.

    I got this from a GK design, but I've had to switch it a bit to work with different amp brands.
     

    Attached Files:

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  13. You beat me to it, I was just building that in Paint! I'll give that a go and let you guys know if I have any other questions, so thank you very much!

    As for the chord, I'm planning on using a stereo jack and a stereo cable to make all this run.

    Thanks again!

    Kyle
     
  14. Oh, sorry, two last questions! First, does it matter which way you orientate the LED? In other words, should the positive lead be soldered to the switch, while the negative should be soldered to the jack piece, or vice versa? Or does it not matter?

    Second, is there any chance of me damaging my amp by building my own switch like this?
     
  15. Yes. Wrong way around and it won't work. And no, as long as you are not introducing external power, you can't damage the amp.
     
  16. jimmy rocket

    jimmy rocket

    Jan 24, 2008
    Ayden, NC
    +1

    I'm not sure off hand which direction will work. LEDs are pretty cheap at RatShack though, so give it a whirl each way around.
     
  17. Excellent, thank you both! I'll try them both!
     
  18. Hey, I'm back already... slight problem before I even got to building.

    In my parts search, I'm unable to find a nice sturdy SPDT switch to withstand being stomped on. Would the attached diagram work with a DPDT switch? Or have I opened another can of worms?

    I just took the SPDT switch and put everything on the left row of the DPDT switch. And please disregard the LED orientation, that's something I'll figure out through trial and error.

    Thanks!

    Best wishes,

    Kyle
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Should be fine. The two poles of a DPDT are independent; half of one IS a SPDT.
     
  20. Yeah, that's what I was thinking. I was going off of the Beavis Audio diagrams, and it looked like two SPDT switches glued together.

    Thanks!

    Kyle
     

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