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Double Stops

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by guillermo, Jan 7, 2005.


  1. guillermo

    guillermo

    Oct 1, 2004
    Hi:

    I'm relatively new to Jazz theory and I'm in the process of learning intervals, scales, arpegios etc via the exercises in Ray Brown's book.
    There are some exercises called "Double Stops ....". And,
    on this months Bass Player magazine there's a Dave Holland solo transcription for wich the analisys says "look a the Double Stop on bar....".

    What is a Double Stop ?

    Thanks a lot
    Guillermo
     
  2. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    A double stop is more than one note played simultaneously...a common example would the root and the tenth, but it could be any two notes of a given chord. A triple stop would be the same thing with three notes.
     
  3. Steve Brooks

    Steve Brooks

    Jan 6, 2005
    upstate ny
    A double stop is the process of playing two bass notes at the same time. A triple stop would be three notes. They are simply meant to imply a chord.
     
  4. Lyle Caldwell

    Lyle Caldwell

    Sep 7, 2004
    Memphis
    Technically, two notes at once = double stop and three notes at once = chord. However, since you can't play as many notes at once on bass as you can on guitar or keys, most players will just use two notes (double stop) or three notes (triple stop) to imply the larger chord that's happening harmonically at the moment.

    For instance, if the chord you want to imply is Am, you can play the double stop of A and C (the minor 3). But if the chord is Am7, you may want to play the triple stop of A, C, and G (the minor 7).

    And remember that you don't have to play them from the root up. You can play wider voicings with these intervals, which also helps the notes speak more clearly.
     
  5. guillermo

    guillermo

    Oct 1, 2004
    Thanks , I see them now, all arround the place

    Thanks a lot
    Guillermo
     
  6. In the DB jazz world, IMO, what happened first is that somebody ( I wonder who? ) came up with that open D with that F# up just before the G harmonic on the G string, then brought it down a half step ( second finger on the E string to provide the C# or Db, fourth to provide the F on the G string and the rest is ..........can't do it arco without two bows.
    Then Red Mitchell came along with his fifth tuning and well, forget about it, except for Michael Moore who can do double and triples...no problem at all.......what a show-off! :crying:
     
  7. TomSauter

    TomSauter

    Dec 22, 2004
    Kennesaw, GA
    You can bow tenths by bowing on the underside of the strings between the strings and the body of the bass. I looked for a smiley face icon demonstrating this technique, but all I could find was this ninja. :ninja:
     

  8. You can, I can't......I have a low B on the bottom of my fiver.
    Very good Tom and your brain ( and you too ) are welcome to TBDB!
     
  9. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    Technically, why wouldn't a double stop be when two strings are stopped? It's nit-pickey, it's anal retentive, but: do open strings count?
     
  10. It's an open/string single stop!
     
  11. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    I don't understand... how often would anyone want to play a 10th? More often than a 5th? 3rd? why? and how do you reach?
     
  12. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    Play some and see! Don't they sound cool and basso supremo? It's a different interval than a third, so it sounds different.

    Ever check out the hipness of the bass work on Lou Reed's Walk On The Wild Side? There are tenths in there, and some other wide intervals too.
     
  13. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Root on the E string, 10th on the G. Sometimes I play walking lines in tenths, when two-fiving it can be fun to alternate it with dominant or major 7th intervals with the root on the A string, if that makes sense. It's not like I would plan it ahead of time; sometimes it just pops out, like any other technique.
     
  14. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    How often is a taste question, why is a voicing question. The 10th sounds less muddy because of the distance between the intervals. Play an A on the E string and a C# on the A string, then play an A on the E string and a C# on the G string...
     
  15. I do concur....yesireee. Alot of bassists don't think of dynamics in terms of intervals. The bass can sound a little muddy at times, especially when dealing with more than one note at a time.
     
  16. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Oh, well, dynamics, now that's another issue...I never use those. :meh:
     
  17. What do they look like? What are they made of?
     
  18. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    It's not a thing.

    It's when the drummer plays louder.
     
  19. Louder than when he was playing before?
    Or just louder than everyone else combined?
     
  20. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Yes.