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Egg Pin questions

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Dr Rod, Apr 18, 2006.


  1. Dr Rod

    Dr Rod

    Aug 19, 2005
    Hi everyone, if you can help out with these questions I would be very thankful.

    I was wondering if the eggpin accomodates tall people, say 6'1 (1.87m)

    I understand there are two versions, a universal and a goetz compatible. Is the universal just as good and sturdy?

    I have heard that there are problems with the goetz compatible version because it eventually cracks the ebony collar. Does the universal one have the same problem?

    Lemur doesn't have the universal, who does?
     
  2. Hey Dr Rod,

    I've used an eggpin since the late '90's. I'm 5'11" and there seems to be plenty of extra adjustment, so at 6'1" you should have no problem. When I switched to the eggpin (after playing on a stool for more than 20 years!) I replaced my end pin with a goetz unit and have never had an issue with cracking, etc. It's good to know that there is a universal unit available now, as not everyone would want to replace an end pin that works fine in all other respects.

    When I first got my eggpin, I made the mistake of cutting the shaft too short. I got a replacement directly from Mark Gilbert, as Lemur didn't carry them. He told me at that time the best source for eggpin related items was Robertson & Sons in Albuquerque, NM.

    HTH!

    Jim
     
  3. Dr Rod

    Dr Rod

    Aug 19, 2005
    Thanks Jim, that's really good info.

    Do you mean that there is a shaft to be cut to regulate the hight?

    Would you then advise to cut in very small increments until ideal hight is reached?
     
  4. The shaft is adjustable with an allen wrench, so you shouldn't NEED to cut it at all. When I did it, it was in a misguided attempt to get to a more "extreme" angled position for my bass. Looking back, I could have easily gotten the same results without cutting, but by the time I figured that out it was too late.....

    The great thing about the eggpin is that it is almost infinitely adjustable to suit almost any bass or playing style. When I first started using it, I was going for a position very similar to what I had while using a stool. These days I have the bass angled back only slightly, using the eggpin mainly to take the weight off my left thumb.
     
  5. Dr Rod

    Dr Rod

    Aug 19, 2005
    I just got my Eggpin, I am satisfied with the strength of the construction, and with the versatility.

    Now the question is, do you -eggpin users- lug your bass around with the eggpin installed?
    If not, do you leave the cross bar installed? (taking out the actual rod that touches the floor)

    The installation is a bit more laborious than I had expected. I was also concerned about wear in the bolts and threads because it needs to be pretty tightly secured. Has there been any such problems?
     
  6. Mine is so easy to take on and off,I just remove the whole thing for transport and put it back on at the gig. Takes about a minute.
    As far as worrying about stripping the screws, I was concerned at first as well, but it never happened, they are pretty sturdy.
    Also, if you are worried about your original endpin collar getting marked up, you can wrap a piece of rubber around it and use it as a spacer, that way you wouldn't have to tighten it down so much.
     
  7. +1. I just put it in the back pocket of my bass bag. I haven't had any problems with the bolts, either. The rubber crutch tips wear out after a while, but you can find those at any hardware store.

    Jim
     
  8. bribass

    bribass

    Jan 25, 2006
    Northern NJ
    Endorsing Artist; Arnold Schnitzer/ Wil DeSola New Standard RN DB
    For the unEggnitiated, What exactly is an Eggpin and how does it help playing angles?

    Thanx, BG
     
  9. The eggpin is an endpin replacement system that attaches to the collar of your existing endpin. The shaft is attached to a sliding track, which makes it adjustable to any angle. I'll try to get a picture up later.
     
  10. here it is...
     

    Attached Files:

  11. and another view...
     

    Attached Files:

  12. bribass

    bribass

    Jan 25, 2006
    Northern NJ
    Endorsing Artist; Arnold Schnitzer/ Wil DeSola New Standard RN DB
    Hey Reedo35, Thanks so much for the pix post.

    What do you Eggpin users like about changing the angle of the enpin in this way? I geuss it's real popular w/ the Rabbath guys, huh? Is it only effective for taller players?

    BG
     
  13. PB+J

    PB+J

    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    I just put a bent endpin on my bass--it's a poor man's way of trying out what the eggpin does, $20 from George Vance. I'm going to start a thread about it. The simple answer is it changes the balance point/center of gravity of the bass, and you don't have to use your left hand at all to hold the bass. Hard to describe--I think it's an effect you feel more if you tend to stand behind the bass rather than more to the side, which is the position a lot of jazz guys use. It's surprisingly hard to explain, but the long and the short of it is I find the bass much easier to play--I can be more relaxed. I'm tall (6-4) but I think it works for shorter players too
     
  14. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    Chicago

    +1
     
  15. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    How much does it weigh? Wouldn't a simpler solution be to plug the straight hole in in your socket, and drill a new hole at an angle? I did this. I don't get as much center-of-mass offset as I would with the Egger, but it is sure a heck of a lot more convenient! I also like the Laborie approach, but I haven't seen one yet.
    Robobass
     
  16. PB+J

    PB+J

    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    Sure--the hole at ann angle thing would be simpler and lighter. but what angle? And also the idea of drilling the endblock kind of creeps me out. The advantage of the eggpin is you can keep adjusting it till you get it right, then drill the angled hole if you want
     
  17. This is my feeling as well. Once the hole is drilled, it's drilled.
    Whether you like it or not, your bass will never be the same.
     
  18. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Well, I have to admit, the Eggpin offers almost unlimited adjustability. It is certainly the ideal way to find out the ideal balance point for your bass. In practice, however, I just don't see carrying the thing around to rehearsals and gigs. Even more important is the danger to the bottom block. If you asked any engineer, he would tell you that the Eggpin introduces stress on the socket and block for which they were not designed. I haven’t heard of actual block problems, but that doesn’t mean the risk is not real. Bottom blocks do crack, and you don’t want it to happen to you!$$

    I understand the instinctive resistance to the Laborie, but it is probably safer for the bass than the conventional setup. The endpin stress is separated from the string-load-bearing socket, spreading out the forces on the bottom block.

    I also want to point out that my original solution avoids this whole topic. Perhaps not everyone understood. Just plug the straight hole in your existing socket and redrill it at the maximum possible angle. This does not alter the bass itself. While this approach is limited in how much offset you can achieve, it can still make a huge improvement, and you only risk your socket!

    Robobass
     
  19. PB+J

    PB+J

    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    robobass, I don't get it--if you plug the exisitng endpin hole and redrill it, you still need something to anchor the tailpiece to, so you'd still need an endpin socket or something like it, and if you had that it'd be hard to drill at an angle. I think I'm missing part of your suggestion
     
  20. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    OK, 1. You remove the socket from the bass. 2. you carefully prepare a plug and glue it into the existing hole. It would be best if you get hold of a lathe. 3. You carefully mount the socket in a drill press so that the new hole just touches the collar on the bottom and at the other end it should just break through the last bit of taper. That is, make the hole at an angle so it crosses the center axis about halfway up the socket.

    Then put the socket back in place and bring the bass up to tension the way it was before. You have changed nothing except the angle at which the pin leaves the socket.

    Granted, you can't change the angle very much this way. If you want more offset, you could ask a woodworker to turn you a new socket with more diameter and fit it with a bigger collar.

    Having a machinist background, I'm not sure I am explaining myself in a way that is clear for lay people. If anyone else wants to jump in and describe this idea a little better, please do!

    Robobass
     

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