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Endpin rubber unscrewing

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Michal Herman, Dec 2, 2019 at 4:22 AM.


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  1. Michal Herman

    Michal Herman

    May 31, 2013
    I have new bass (yay! ;-) ) but it's endpin rubber is not that great. It's the one that you wind up on the thread.
    Thing is, that it's unscrewing a little after few minutes of playing and starts buzzing on some notes. During practice I can tighten it, but would like not do that during a gig.
    I will replace it eventually, but do you have any ideas with what to smear the screw to make it stay in place better? But nothing permanent, because I will replace it in the near future.
     
  2. mooseonbass

    mooseonbass Supporting Member

    Jun 24, 2011
    Boston
    Removable loktite, or nail polish. I have the same problem on my new bass and have been too lazy to fix it. Out of curiosity, I also want to try teflon tape.
     
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  3. Ukiah Bass

    Ukiah Bass Supporting Member

    May 10, 2006
    I also have a new double bass and experienced the same issue. My solution was to screw the rubber stop about half way up the thread. It allows the bass to swivel smoothly while you play. The movement is silent. The rubber stop (and bass) is anchored in the same spot. Less wear and tear on the rubber, too!
     
  4. Michal Herman

    Michal Herman

    May 31, 2013
    @Ukiah Bass Thanks for reply, but I don't know, if I fully understand.
    If i leave thread "half way up" isn't it lose and can drop of the endpin while transporting?
     
  5. Dr. Love

    Dr. Love Supporting Member

    Nov 5, 2008
    Lubbock, TX
    If your endpin has the little brass bushing at the top of the threads that the endpin foot screws up against like mine does, maybe a rubber washer in between the bushing and the endpin foot would give enough friction to hold it in place.
     
    DoubleMIDI and Michal Herman like this.
  6. Ukiah Bass

    Ukiah Bass Supporting Member

    May 10, 2006
    Yes, it is loose in that position. Hard to unwind itself during transport, but something to check at destination.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2019 at 11:23 AM
  7. Michal Herman

    Michal Herman

    May 31, 2013
    Yes, it has this "brass bushing". Is this part really necessary? When I take it of completely there is no buzzing..
     
  8. Not my native language...

    Is this bushing a metal disk that can be screwed up and down the thread?

    If this is the case it should be screwed against the rubber endpin to keep it in place. Better a bit tighter than too loose.
     
  9. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    I have always hated the "screw on" approach. For years I offered a titanium pin with a "press fit" Delrin bushing which presses snugly onto the pin, and the rubber crutch tip presses snugly onto the bushing. No rattle or risk of falling off. They were as popular as gangrene, so I stopped making them. I do use this approach with my angled endpin product, and no one has complained about it. The problem here is that everyone in our world is hidebound. The majority of players and repairers are unwilling to consider a design without threads, ergo no manufacturer is prepared to offer one.
     
  10. Ukiah Bass

    Ukiah Bass Supporting Member

    May 10, 2006
    This shows the rubber endpin slightly unscrewed for noise-free swiveling.

    RubberEnd-sm.JPG
     
    Michal Herman likes this.
  11. RSBBass

    RSBBass

    Jun 11, 2011
    NYC
    Teflon plumbers tape could help.
     
    duckyincarnate likes this.
  12. neilG

    neilG

    Jun 15, 2003
    Ventura, CA
    I have screw-on tips on my basses and they rarely come loose. Just crank it down harder.
    The advantage of a threaded pin is that you can quickly and easily go from spike to rubber tip. The purpose of the brass disc is to stop the bottom of the threaded insert in the rubber tip from hitting the sharpened end of the end pin and dulling it.
     
    WillieB and Michal Herman like this.
  13. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    My press on design also allows you to quickly change from point to rubber tip, only faster, and it is lighter!
     
    Michal Herman likes this.
  14. mooseonbass

    mooseonbass Supporting Member

    Jun 24, 2011
    Boston
    I tried teflon tape last night, it worked fine. We’ll see if it lasts.
     
  15. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    It won't last. Just keep a roll in your case!
     
    Don Kasper likes this.
  16. notabene

    notabene

    Sep 20, 2010
    SF Bay area
    wrap a bit of a plastic bag around the pin. As much as needed to make screwing it on have some resistance. Lasts forever, easy to take off, easy to replace.
     
  17. neilG

    neilG

    Jun 15, 2003
    Ventura, CA
    Oh, yeah, I re-read your description of it. Couldn't be simpler.
    end pin.jpg Here's my much more complicated Lou DiLeone creation: It's a 1/4" brass nipple reamed to press fit onto the 10mm pin. The tip is 1/4" galvanized coupler that a 3/4" crutch tip fits perfectly onto. The beauty of this setup is that if you lose a tip, you can get the parts at most hardware stores for a few dollars.
     
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  18. turf3

    turf3

    Sep 26, 2011
    Here's my solution. Piece of dowel; drill a longitudinal blind hole; epoxy onto end of rod; shave down to make a tight fit into the crutch tip. The larger tip's ID actually has a step thus the step on the dowel.

    I never use a pointy end pin. Most places I play, someone would kill me if I stabbed that thing into the floor. Picture1.gif
     
  19. Don Kasper

    Don Kasper Supporting Member

    I'm not fond of using a crutch-tip (at an angle), or a large sphere to adequately grip the floor/surface.
    I fabricated this endpin gizmo which has a spherical shape underneath the rubber covering, so that there is a minimal footprint & (therefore) maximum pressure and grip between the surface of the floor and the gizmo.
    It takes just seconds to remove the gizmo to expose the very sharp point, if necessary.
    IMG_4033.JPG
     
    damonsmith likes this.
  20. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I am going to try this with my office bass, which has had this problem for years.
     

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