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Good EUB for crossing over from EB

Discussion in 'Electric Upright Basses (EUB's) [DB]' started by ed morgan, May 8, 2015.


  1. Hi everyone. I'm usually on the electric bass side but I
    have wanted an upright bass for years. I don't have room for an acoustic one and I like the sound of an electric better anyway so I'm thinking about an eub. In your opinion what is the best bang for the buck when looking at eub's,and which has the closest sound to a traditional electric bass? Also,are eub's tuned different than an EB,and if so,do they have to be or can they be tuned the same as an EB?
     
  2. Last edited: May 8, 2015
    ed morgan likes this.
  3. Thanks,I'll check these out.
     
  4. Mark Gollihur

    Mark Gollihur Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 19, 2000
    Mullica Hill, NJ
    Owner/President, Gollihur Music LLC
    Seems you'd also be a prime candidate for an NS Design Omni Bass. <-- That's the NXT version, they also make a top shelf version. 4 and 5 string models, comes with a "wearable" strap contraption (and can be played on optional stands as well.) The CR model even comes with magnetic pickups (that can blend with the bridge pickups). You can even "rotate" the bass down and play it horizontally. Might be worth a look.
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  5. Indeed Mark, this is more an EUB than the Barker Vertical.
    However, he may want to get the fretted one, if he wants the tone to be like a traditional electric bass.
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  6. Mark Gollihur

    Mark Gollihur Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 19, 2000
    Mullica Hill, NJ
    Owner/President, Gollihur Music LLC
    Yep. And that one is only available in the CR-Grade, so he'll need a few extra ducats...
     
  7. ArtechnikA

    ArtechnikA I endorsed a check once... Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 24, 2013
    SEPA
    You may need to decide exactly what it is you're looking for.
    The big difference between EBG and EUB is scale length. (And that fretted/fretless thing...)

    The OmniBass is a cool instrument with more of a cello-like scale (although it is typically tuned like a bass, in 4ths, not like a cello, in 5ths...)
    Since I was looking for an introduction to DB, the 41" scale was important to me, so I went for an NS Design NXT-5. They're also available in 4-string versions which are lighter and cheaper. Upscale a bit is the CRM-4/5 which has magnetic pickups in addition to the piezos.

    An NXT with Contemporary strings (these come with the instrument) can do a really good job of sounding like a fretless EBG if that's what you're going for.
    I found them a bit too bright to really sound like DB, and I've already got the fretless EBG front covered.
    With Traditionals and a bit of foam behind the bridge to dampen the sustain a bit it cops a very convincing DB sound.
    And of course the fingering and arco aspects should transition quite well to DB, in the event I ever have that much room for instrument storage...
     
    ZENBASSGUY and ed morgan like this.
  8. basspraiser

    basspraiser Jammin for the Lamb! Supporting Member

    Dec 8, 2006
    Chicago - NW Burbs
    Ed

    I am in the exact same boat as you... Eb player wanting to learn upright.

    A friend is loaning me his NS CR4M and I really like it so far...

    I can make it sounds like an upright ( pretty much anyways) or a fretless bass with a few knob changes.

    These are not cheap but seem to be a good deal for the quality..

    I have not tried the NXT series yet.

    I heard good things but think I will stick with the CR.

    Trying to work out a deal with the " loaner"now.

    Have fun...

    Peace

    Doug
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  9. Solo tuning, piccolo, tuning in 5ths, drop D... :woot: ;)

    Don't mind me, just that I've been eyeing a few EUBs lately and this thread caught my eye. Back to lurking...
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  10. Thanks everyone,these are great suggestions! The sound I'm looking for is double bass sound tone-wise with a little more sustain and zero rattle/buzz,definitely fretless. I asked about tuning because years ago I played a double bass and it was not tuned like a normal bass guitar,none of the playing patterns were the same at all. Took me awhile to figure it out. The same night I played a fretted double bass,the only one I've ever seen,and it was tuned like a normal bass. I didn't know cellos were tuned differently so maybe the first bass was tuned like one of those. I'll definitely check out all your suggesting!
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2015
  11. lorianb

    lorianb

    Apr 10, 2011
    Ottawa
    Tuning in Fifths is adhered to by some classical players. Here's a good article about it: Tuning in Fifths | Joel Quarrington Popular amongst cello, violin and kazoo players as well.
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  12. Fifths is adhered to by some jazzers, too.
    Fifths-tuning drives me mad on mandolin, fuming on fiddle... Never tried it on bass (nor kazoo, and I had a gig once requiring DB & Kazoo).
    I recently got to play a 5-string NS cello (tuned BEADG) and a 4-string NS Bass (EADG); no idea what exact models/quality they were, but both were tremendous fun to play despite the strings being nearly on the fingerboard yet not buzzing (my DBs are set about 7mm-9mm).
    Best wishes in your EUB quest EM!
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  13. The late Red Mitchell was famous for playing in fifths.
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  14. jthisdell

    jthisdell Supporting Member

    Jun 12, 2014
    Roanoke, VA
    I got a NS Designs NXT4 about a year ago and it made the transition pretty easy. I was able to gig with it after about six weeks, although that was a struggle. Really after 4-6 moths it got pretty natural. The fret markers make intonation pretty easy but getting good tone has been a job. I switched the strings to traditionals and got a pre with a super high impedence input and then finally bought a much flatter cab and am finally happy with the sound. I tune mine EADG (as it should be). But like, you, storing and transporting a full DB was just not an option for me and while I would love to really play a full DB, I could not have possibly transitioned to one this quickly. Lately I have found myself taking my Fender P to gigs, unpacking it, tuning it up, playing my EUB all night and then packing my P back up for the trip home! I have not had the chance to try the CR series and would love to but have learned to be able to get along well with my NXT.
     
    ed morgan likes this.
  15. Interesting reading on fifths. Thanks for that.
     
  16. What preamp and cab did you end up using?
     
  17. jthisdell

    jthisdell Supporting Member

    Jun 12, 2014
    Roanoke, VA
    I got a radial bassbone od because I switch between by BG and the EUB and I needed a pre with the super high 10 ohm impedance for the EUB. There are other less expensive options such as the tone bone v2 which was not available when I got mine. Also the fdeck has the right input impedance and a hpf for less money if you don't need to double. I bought a Bergantino NV115 but also really liked the Berg HD112, I think the EUB benefits from a flatter more hi hi cab.
     
  18. Probably a typo, he meant a 10 MehOhms input impedance. 10 Ohms is almost a short circuit.
     
  19. jthisdell

    jthisdell Supporting Member

    Jun 12, 2014
    Roanoke, VA
    10 - 10,000 what's the difference?
     
  20. ArtechnikA

    ArtechnikA I endorsed a check once... Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 24, 2013
    SEPA
    I wasn't going to comment but now it's a bit silly.

    a MehOhm is an Ohm that doesn't really care. It's just OK.
    (Yes, I know that's a typo too - in a post pointing out typos...)
    A MegOhm, on the other hand, is a Million Ohms -- not 10,000.
    (Yes, I suspect jthisdell was not intending to be taken literally either...)
     

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