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head output question

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Aenema, Sep 2, 2005.


  1. Aenema

    Aenema

    Apr 18, 2001
    Michigan
    ok heres the dilema... i want to get a gk 1001 rb II which puts out 460 watts and 8 ohms. i plan on getting a 1x12 neo and 2x10 to go with it. id like to use the 1x12 neo by itself for church gigs but the head will be putting out 460 watts and the speaker only handles 300 watts. will it be ok as long as i dont turn the head up too loud? i recall reading that the volume knob is related to how much power the head puts out. for example... maybe this head puts out 50 watts witht he volume at 1, and 100 watts 2, and 150 watts on 3 and so on. this is just for example and is mostly like not accurate but you see my basic idea. is this how it worx though?
     
  2. cheezewiz

    cheezewiz

    Mar 27, 2002
    Ohio
    You'll be fine with that head and cab. Don't run it on 10, but NO amp sounds good that way anyway (cept an SVT)
     
  3. Aenema

    Aenema

    Apr 18, 2001
    Michigan
    are the volume knobs actually relative to the power output of the heads? lets say i had the master half way up. would the head be putting out half of its power?
     
  4. Im not sure if its linear or logorythmic

    but either way it will, the more power going to a speaker the louder it will be basically
     
  5. Aenema

    Aenema

    Apr 18, 2001
    Michigan
    it would just be interesting to know... anyone? :bassist:
     
  6. No, the volume knob just attenuates (cuts) gain.

    So the power the amp puts out is a function of the load (the speaker--how many ohms) and the power of the input signal.

    The amp could be delivering its full rated power into a given speaker cabinet with the volume knob set on 1/2 if its input signal is strong enough. An even stronger input signal could drive the amp to its full power with the knob at 1/4, for example.
     
  7. Aenema

    Aenema

    Apr 18, 2001
    Michigan
    signal input? meaning the bass? and can you answer my original question since you seem to be knowledgable? :help:
     
  8. NO!

    If you have a high output bass, you could get all 450 watts with the master on 2 out of 10.

    And your speaker will be fine as long as you make sure it sounds clean, not distorted.

    Randy
     
  9. Passinwind

    Passinwind I Know Nothing Supporting Member

    Yes. Just because your amp can put out 460 watts into an 8 ohm load doesn't necessarily mean it will be doing that.

    maybe this head puts out 50 watts with the volume at 1, and 100 watts 2, and 150 watts on 3 and so on. this is just for example and is mostly like not accurate but you see my basic idea. is this how it worx though?

    As Bill said, that depends on the input signal (your bass and how hard you are playing it, whether you are in the active or passive mode, etc.), but it also depends on how your tone controls are set, what effects you have in the effects loop and how they are set, and so on. The volume control position will not tell you how much power the amp is putting out, that's essentially a job for your ears. :cool: In any case, most volume controls are logarithmic, so in your example one might be 1 watt, three 10 watts, five 100 watts, etc., at some given settings of the rest of the controls, and given a steady input signal. At some other setting, one might be 200 watts though, dig?
     
  10. Aenema

    Aenema

    Apr 18, 2001
    Michigan
    yeah i can dig it. :cool: :bassist: lol thanx guys i appreciate it. im a technical kinda guy and always like to know how things work so i understand them better.
     
  11. yeah, my bad with that post, i got that wrong, that makes sense as to why most power amp in jacks give you the power amp at full volume :oops:
     

  12. (modestly) Well I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express a while back.... :D

    Anyhow, it appears everyone has contributed to a good answer. Glad to help!