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How would you choose to die?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by UncleFluffy, Oct 28, 2013.


  1. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
    (Somewhat stolen from a thread on Reddit.)

    If you had the choice, how would you choose to die?

    My answer: "Watching the heat death of the universe while chugging the last beer in existence."

    ... and you?
     
  2. tastybasslines

    tastybasslines Banned

    May 9, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    Massive heart attack during sex.
     
  3. In my sleep, from natural causes, after living out a healthy and happy life.
     
  4. Wide awake. It's only gonna happen once to me. Don't wanna miss it.
     
  5. On the other hand, I've heard great stories from people that have died and regained life. To my knowledge, the white tunnel thing is supposed to be true. Some say it's very euphoric and peaceful, just before the end. That might be interesting to experience.
     
  6. paste

    paste

    Oct 3, 2011
    Michigan
    I heard Aldous Huxley asked his wife to give him a massive dose of LSD on his deathbed. This sounds like a pretty good way to go.
     
  7. hbarcat

    hbarcat Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2006
    Rochelle, Illinois
    I used to think about that once in awhile and came up with a few good ones that I though would satisfy me. But I've since changed my mind and now I don't really know how to answer that question.

    This past June I experienced a medical emergency that required immediate surgery that I didn't expect to survive. I was clinically dead for several hours with my heart stopped and no measurable brain activity, and my body temperature purposely lowered to a controlled 55 F. I remember waking up in the ICU (4 days later) and thinking, "Hey, I survived this. Cool."

    But no white tunnel. No feelings of euphoria or peacefulness. At no time did I have any kind of epiphany or cosmic revelation. Those types of responses commonly happen when the brain is deprived of oxygen under conditions beyond the control of doctors.

    In the nearly four months since my accident, I've had to make some fundamental changes to my beliefs about end of life experiences. Before this, I was sure I knew some answers. Now I realize I know very little.
     
  8. sky diving with no chute...wouldnt feel a thing
     
  9. Hi.

    Someone's bound to quote the following anyway, so it might as well be me:

    "I would like to die peacefully in my sleep as my uncle did, not screaming in horror like the passengers in his bus did".

    Having had quite a few really close encounters with the Reaper, I just hope it will be quick.

    I don't mind dying, nor am I afraid of it, but prolonged suffering is something I would avoid at all costs.

    Regards
    Sam

    Regrds
    Sam
     
  10. Yeah, it tends to be reported more often when people are deprived of oxygen. The brain starts to alter certain functions in an effort to preserve itself for as long as possible. I'm not sure which causes of death do and don't lead to the same experiences, though.

    I'm inclined to believe that it's a dying brain phenomena, rather than a spiritual one, but that's a different topic.:hyper:
     
  11. gkbass13

    gkbass13 Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2006
    Chicago
    Shooting a massive hit of heroin for the first time right before leaving the plane to sky dive with no parachute.
     
  12. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    I honestly don't know how to answer this truthfully. Earlier this year, I was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. After one week of being in pain and believing I had 6-12 months to live, I believed I was dying. That's a very interesting place to go to in your head. The biopsy revealed that I have what Steve Jobs had and I know I am walking away from this ungly disease. I am well on my way.

    The silver lining of this year of being admitted to hospital 8 times, going through the pleasures of cheotherapy, getting septecemia, being taken to hospital twice by ambulance, has been living in the moment and savouring life. Every minute of it. I know it will end.

    Having such a close call and looking at death in the face and a painful way to go, I'd have to side with a lethal orgasm that's followed with an immediatefast check out. The no-parachute gig sounds amusing. Human slingshot over the Grand Canyon, or off a roof top in New York (at night) into Times Square on New Year's Eve could be pretty cool.
     
  13. gkbass13

    gkbass13 Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2006
    Chicago
    Thank you for sharing your story. I wish you the best in your battle.
     
  14. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Guest

    May 19, 2012
    In my sleep so I don't notice ;)
     
  15. Phalex

    Phalex Semper Gumby Supporting Member

    Oct 3, 2006
    G.R. MI
    I want it to be a complete surprise. I don't really care if it's particularly painful, just so long as it's quick.

    My father died of absolutely nothing. He kept himself in great shape and died from his body being too old. That really looks like a hard row to hoe. No thanks.
     
  16. in my sleep, the end.
     
  17. Clark Dark

    Clark Dark

    Mar 3, 2005
    earth
    between Halle Berry and Scarlett Johanson ;)
     
  18. tastybasslines

    tastybasslines Banned

    May 9, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    You'd pass out almost immediately and wouldn't get to enjoy your "ride".
     
  19. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Supporting Member

    May 20, 2005
    Norman, OK, USA
    "In my own bed, at the age of 80, with a belly full of wine and a girl's mouth around my ----."
     
  20. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    I swear, I was about to post the same quote but I couldn't figure out the best way to censor it.
     

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