Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by ImAGoodDuck, Nov 27, 2004.

  1. Can someone explain to me what an inversion is and how it works?
  2. Getao


    Jun 17, 2004
    Menlo Park, CA
    in BASIC, an inversion is something like taking a Cmaj chord and starting on E or G, isntead of C.

    Generally it is notated in such ways as C7 / A or C / E...

    However, then you start running into issues with chord voicings, and what people intend. It can get very confusing when you are trying to decide whether it is a D chord meant by C / D or a C9, for example (I'm not very solid on this either) :eek:
  3. leanne


    May 29, 2002
    Rochester, NY
    Here's a basic example w/a C triad:
    fundamental position: C E G
    1st inversion: E G C
    2nd inversion: G C E
  4. If you factor in octaves you can do a lot with those 3 or 4 notes.
  5. Ok, thanks. I think I knew that but I didn't know the name. So I was listening to this guy go on and on about inversion and I was thinkin, "hey, what's an inversion? :confused: ". Thanks though I think I got it.
  6. stephanie


    Nov 14, 2000
    Scranton, PA
    This may be a silly question, but since we're on the subject of inversions...

    Is there such a thing as a 3rd inversion? I swear I've read mention of such on TB or maybe it was elsewhere. If so, what exactly is it? Would it include the 7th of the chord? I.E say Cmaj7 3rd inversion = B C E G?
  7. leanne


    May 29, 2002
    Rochester, NY
    Yes, it keeps going like that:
    a triad has 3 possible inversions (including root position)
    a 7 chord has 4
    a 9 chord has 5
    an 11 chord has 6, etc...
    Beyond that, the next inversion would just repeat the same notes up an octave (ie 4th inversion for a C triad = C E G in the next octave)
  8. stephanie


    Nov 14, 2000
    Scranton, PA
    Ah interesting. Thanks. :)