1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Jeff Berlin Discussing Music Ed

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JeffBerlin, Nov 24, 2009.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Well said! If you apply this difference in your musical life, then you will improve in two musical areas. Good luck!
     
  2. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    I assume that most colleges or universities have a music department. You can study with their teachers and hopefully, they know what and how to teach you. Another thought is to locate the best jazz players in your town (assuming that your town actually have any). They might guide you toward musical improvement as well.

    High levels of playing happen as quickly as it takes somebody to climb Mt. Everest. It TAKES A LONG TIME AND THERE ARE OBSTACLES IN YOUR WAY. Because I know this and because I am not bothered with instant gratification nor annoyed by bad practice or band playing days, I steadily improve even though I am three years away from being sixty. Learn from my experience; study regularly, study the "good stuff" and don't learn music in time except to count it. Once you've learned it, you will be in time anyway, so keep practicing this way. Good luck.
     
  3. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    It is hard to say. I don't know what you know, and I don't know what you are actually studying, in what manner, at what tempo, in what keys.

    I am quite certain that you are teaching yourself and I recommend that you stop this. Find a great jazz teacher (no music offers more academic bite than jazz music does). Take those lessons and get to work. Your teacher will keep you on the straight and narrow, to get you to learn correctly. Best of luck!
     
  4. Hoover

    Hoover Banned

    Nov 2, 2007
    New York City
    Sure, but that's a bit like saying "eggs are the roundest food in the Dairy aisle" ...you're ignoring the fact that every supermarket in the civilized world also has a Fruit & Vegetable aisle full of numerous contenders for the Roundest title.

    I suspect a generalization that better serves this argument would be "jazz is probably the most harmonically complex music a jobbing electric bassist is likely to encounter on a typical gig", yes?
     
  5. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    1
     
  6. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009


    A good teacher is a teacher who teaches musical principles that have already been established and proven beyond a shadow of a doubt. There are so many exercises and homeworks that have been 100% validated in helping you to improve as a player, but many, maybe too many teachers don't know what they are. The only suggestion that I can make is to ask around and see what the rep of the teacher that you are interested in has. Ask great jazz players who they think is a great teacher. It is the best way to get good advice.
     
  7. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Sorry young man, but I don't understand the question. Maybe someone else can decipher it for me.
     
  8. My bet is he's confused by accidentals and how their used.

    bench - do you know what accidentals are?
     
  9. smeet

    smeet Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 27, 2006
    Woodland Hills, CA
    I think he's saying that the book uses accidentals in a non-traditional way, so that an sharped/flatted note is not automatically sharped/flatted for the remainder of the bar.

    I don't think that's true. I think the notation in the book is the same as any other music. If the B is "accidented" at the beginning of the bar, it applies to the rest of the bar as well. There may be typos, but I'm pretty sure that is the intention. It's standard notation.
     
  10. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Correct! If a note is sharped or flattened, the same note on that staff line or space retains the altered pitch sound until the next bar begins. This is standard notational facts. I hope that this was the question that he asked.
     
  11. Yes, i agree Jeff with your counsel to me, in particular, and welcome your observations. I can appreciate the stern truth.

    I am no where near the playing level i thought i would've been at when i intially started. Playing bass (or attempting to, lol) is one instrument that'll keep you honest, as all it takes is for me to hear from others, what i desire to myself on the instrument.
     
  12. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    In time, you could pass me by, but only if you keep music at the center of your playing life. By the way, I like that comment, "the stern truth! Very impressive. It is nothing more than hearing what is, rather than what one wants. The truth is, musical improvement takes effort and the right kinds of material. I just tell people things and speak with them as adults. This is one reason why I dislike forums; they are social clubs, not places to improve or find much good guidance. I am here to talk music and have fun doing it. I am not here to defend myself, not anymore. If some wish to follow my advice, then great. If others prefer not do to this, then fine for them. It is no skin off my nose. I love music too much to try and make more than a concise effort anymore to pass along some basic logic about playing. For anybody who doesn't like what I say, then fine. The truth is, I've survived in a business for over 35 years, where so many colleagues of the past have not. Many of my past colleagues are gone, disapeared because they thought that they knew more about music and playing than they really did. Some didn't like what I used to say years ago about getting serious either. The reality of our industry caught up to them. I don't want this to happen to others, and so, I will tell you what you need to hear. I hope that others are like you, able to hear some truths and use them to their advantage. Good for you!!!

    P.S. Some here have said that they don't have professional aspirations. But, logically, if one owns an instrument, then one must have an interest in playing it, just for the pleasure of making music come from it. To do this, you need to know what the notes are, and how to make those notes come from your bass. In other words, even a half decent amateur has to know how to play or else their instrument can't bring them much pleasure. Learn well, and you will play well.
     
  13. Eminentbass

    Eminentbass

    Jun 7, 2006
    South Africa
    Endorsing Artist: Ashdown Amps and Sandberg Basses.
    My point in saying that jazz is the most harmonically complex music in the non-classical/modern world(modern contemporary musical world would be more apt i suppose) has to do with the fact that there are only twelve notes in western music but jazz will give you the opportunity to explore the most varied and vast combinations of what chord voicings, chord sequences and melodic options are available with these notes. That is at the very least just great ear training and a way to get familiar with one's instrument, regardless of the style of music one chooses to pursue.
     
  14. CoffeeJanitor

    CoffeeJanitor

    Jun 4, 2009
    Thanks man. Yeah, I'm actually trying to contact a pretty reputable jazz double bassist that teaches at a music school nearby me and has toured with some greats (I'm in the Twin Cities which, as far as I know, has a pretty great jazz scene).

    I made sure that all of the colleges I applied to had very respectable music schools, also.

    Also, I have stopped using a metronome in my practice routine. Not because of what you've said here, but because I'm pretty sure my one year old nephew hid it somewhere in the house. Fate, maybe? :ninja:

    Thanks to all the pros in here who are answering Q's.
     
  15. Nicely stated.

    ...and on edit: sigged.
     
  16. bench

    bench

    Dec 28, 2007
    Germany

    that´s exactly what i mean, i didn´t know the word "accidentals", in germany they´re called "Vorzeichen"...

    But they are definitely not used in the traditional way in the chord studies book and that´s my problem....

    if you look at the first three etudes for each chord (the ones with the approach notes...) they use an accidental for every sharped/flatted note in the bar and NOT in the traditional way with one accidental for the whole bar.

    the real problem with this way of notation, at least for me, is the use of naturals (is it the right word this: ♮ ???) which seems contradictory to using an accidental for every note...

    i hope that someone looks at etude 4 of the e flat dom7 chord, esp. bar 2 and four.....
     
  17. bench

    bench

    Dec 28, 2007
    Germany
    for clarification i took two photos:

    the first shows an example of the use of accidentals.

    IMG_3352_t.


    the second shows the two bars i was talking about (e flat dom7). Would you play the d´s in the upper bar (8th and 13th note) as d or as d flat? And what about the naturals in the beginning of the lower bar (f and e)?

    IMG_3349_t.

    hope that works....

    thanks bench
     
  18. basmartin

    basmartin

    Aug 6, 2007
    Sweden
    D-flat, that accidental remains the whole bar. About the naturals in the lower bars, I need to know the key signature to comment on that. But if you look att the previous bar, the last note is an F-sharp, right? The first note in the next bar is an F-natural. Sometimes you use accidentals as a reminders, in this case it reminds that the F is back to natural.
     
  19. Freddels

    Freddels Musical Anarchist

    Apr 7, 2005
    Sutton, MA
    ^^ and sometimes there are typo's so you have to use your ear.
     
  20. Eminentbass

    Eminentbass

    Jun 7, 2006
    South Africa
    Endorsing Artist: Ashdown Amps and Sandberg Basses.
    Hi jeff, i asked this a while back but it probably got flooded in the mass of debates(which i'm guilty of adding to). Is the harmony/theory book that is used at the Player's School available from the school or online at all? I've ordered Chord Studies but i'm also looking for a general non-bass specific source of information. Thank you.
     

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.